Easwaran Kanason

Co - founder of PetroEdge
Last Updated: October 24, 2016
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Business Trends
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Last week in world oil:

All of Saudi Arabia’s bluster can’t hide the fact that the tenuous OPEC agreement to cut production had hit a number of obstacles, with the latest being that Iraq wants exemption from the cuts, just as Nigeria, Libya and Iran do. That was enough to send oil prices lower today, though they remain just above the US$50/b level.

Mexico has approved Italy’s Eni to go ahead with test drilling at the Amoca 2 well, a shallow water field in the Gulf of Mexico. It is only the second well to be drilled in Mexico since reforms to open up its energy sector dissolved Pemex’s upstream monopoly. The first well was Amoca 1, also by Eni, part of an acreage that is estimated to hold some 800 million barrels of oil and 480 bcf of associated gas. 

Announcements of asset sales by supermajors are common these days, particularly from Shell, seeking to pay for its acquisition of the BG Group. The latest involves some US$1.3 billion of non-core oil and gas properties in western Canada exchanging hands between Shell and Tourmaline Oil, including onshore land in the Gundy area of British Columbia and the Deep Basin area of Alberta that currently have a minor production output of 25 kb/d, with reasonable room for growth.

Higher prices spur more rigs, and the US operational oil rig count jumped by 11 last week, bringing the total to 443. Gas rigs also added 3 to their number, up to 108, as nimble onshore producers react to the positive price signals. The number of offshore rigs remains unchanged at 23.

There’s a problem looming in PDVSA and it threatens to spill over into the US Gulf. Beset with a huge amount of debt, the Venezuelan national oil company has been attempting to negotiate short-term measures to defer its debt, with the spectre of a default looming on the horizon. Already, Curacao appears to be abandoning PDVSA, seeking Chinese involvement in its refinery, while the woes are affecting PDVSA’s subsidiary Citgo in the USA and its Aruba refinery. A default would also wreck havoc with the US Gulf Coast refining system, dependent on Venezuela’s output that supplies a third of the crude processed along the Gulf Coast.

Qatargas has inked a deal with Petronas LNG UK to supply 1.1 million tons of LNG per year through 2023, extending a contract that was due to expire at the end of 2018. The deal is particularly important for Qatar, as it seeks to secure long-term supply agreements in the face of a looming global glut of gas supplies from Australia and the US, with Europe being a priority target. The LNG will be supplied from Qatargas 4, a joint venture between Qatar Petroleum and Shell, with the supplies delivered to the Dragon LNG terminal in Milford Haven in the UK. Qatargas is also looking at securing supply agreements in Rotterdam, which would be its gateway into western continental Europe.

The Chinese upstream sector is considered expensive, inefficient and now, declining. China’s crude output fell by 9.8% y-o-y in September, as low oil prices make imports cheaper while making the case that the country’s high-cost fields, like Daqing and Shengli, should be shut down. Crude output in August fell by 9.9%, the highest y-o-y decline on record, while September crude imports growth reached 18%.

Petrobras has finally reached a deal for its mothballed Nansei Seikyu refinery in Okinawa, agreeing to sell it to Japan’s Taiyo Oil for US$129.3 million as it continues on its asset sale spree to reduce its debt. The Okinawan refinery, an oddball choice that was acquired by Petrobras in 2007, has proven particularly difficult to sell, having its refining operations shut down last year due to the industry downturn. 

With the downstream oil market in doldrums but the petrochemical industry still holding strong, Saudi Arabia is aiming to capitalise on that by focusing on a giant crude-to-chemicals project. Saudi Aramco and SABIC have formed a joint management team, together with a unnamed third party, to assess the viability of such a project that would cut out the middle link in petrochemical production, bypassing gasoline and diesel to go straight into chemicals. A preliminary study is expected in 2017, and is in line with the Kingdom’s stated desire to diversify its economy away from crude petroleum sales.

After the US$15 billion Inpex/Shell plan to boost output at the Masela natural gas field by 2.5 mtpa utilising a floating LNG facility was rejected by the Indonesian government in March, a new plan has been proposed to build an onshore LNG plant on the islands of Aru or Saumlaki. The anticipated start date of the giant gas field has been pushed into the late 2020s, and to recoup investment, Inpex is proposing a near quadrupling of output, to between 7.5-9.5 mtpa in total now. A decision on the new proposal is expected from the Indonesian government within the month.

Under pressure gas player Santos has sold its offshore natural gas assets in Victoria to Australia’s Cooper Energy for US$62 million. The sale marks the exit of Santos from offshore Victoria following the sale of its Kipper field for US$520 million in March. The assets include interests in the Casino-Henry gas project, as well as control of the Sole field and Orbost gas plant in Gippsland Basin.

In another sign that petrochemicals are booming, India’s Reliance has beaten forecasts by posting an 18% y-o-y increase in its Q2 profit, buoyed by its petrochemicals business. Reliance’s petrochemicals margins for Q216 were 15%, the highest in nearly four years, while its refining margins fell sharply due to weak product prices. 

Meanwhile in the rig-making sector, Singapore’s Keppel Oil saw its quarterly profits fall by 38% on a weak offshore market. Cost-cutting measure and job cuts – more than 8,000 so far in 2016 – are continuing, and the company will also look at mothballing some facilities until 2020. 

Have a productive week ahead!

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Infographic: Oil and Gas Scams & How to avoid them!

Oil and gas sector is one of the most lucrative sectors for job seekers from industries all over the world. It offers great salaries and benefits packages and an opportunity to travel and work overseas. Due to its high demand, scammers are preying on the vulnerable oil and gas workers. To ensure you don’t fall prey to their mischievous tactics, we would recommend reading our guideline below:

How does scamming occur? 

The scammer poses as an employer or recruiter of an oil and gas company or he may claim to be an employee or recruiter for a job consultancy firm catering to the oil and gas industry. They offer irresistible employment opportunities and often demand money in advance to conduct further processes. Money is often demanded on the pretext of work visas, travel expenses, background or credit checks that the job requires.

What do scammers want from you?

 It is important to understand what the scammer's agenda is so that it helps you shield yourself from getting conned:

To extract money: On the pretext of getting you a job in the energy sector employing any of the tactics mentioned above

For identity theft: scammers look for valid identity of people and ask for confidential personal details including bank details to commit fraud through your name or to withdraw money from your account.

Whatever be their modus operandi, their goal is to either separate you from your cash or accomplish an identity theft. The bigger problem is, the scammers are getting better at their game and coming up with innovative ideas to lure innocent job seekers. In oil and gas industry, the scammers are targeting the job seekers from overseas, immigrants or contractors as they feel it is easier to attract them on the pretext of work permits, high salaries, paid travel, better lifestyle in the first world countries.

How to spot a job scam and keep yourself secure?

 There is always a difference between real and fake, all you need to do is be watchful to notice the underlying discrepancies. There is a pattern that scammers usually follows, which is discussed below. Make sure you watch out for these red flags when you receive any job offer next time:

Free email provider - No legitimate hiring agency or company will use the services of free email provider like Gmail, Hotmail, or Yahoo. So, if you are receiving an email or have been requested to share your details on emails that use free email services, then be extremely cautious. The scammers try to trick the job seekers by using an email address that looks authentic for instance: [email protected]. It is important to notice here that the ‘xyz’ part of the email ID is usually a gmail, yahoo, etc. which is a free email address. A legitimate job provider would never use.

Fake or new company name - If company name or oil and gas recruitment agency name is mentioned along with the free email id, then do a quick search on the company. Verify its existence and contact them via official email address and contact numbers mentioned on the website. Check their social media presence too. If the website and social media page look new while the company claims to be in business for a substantial amount of time, know for sure that there is something fishy.

Bad grammar and confusing job details - The scammers usually do not pay much attention to structure the mail. You can spot grammatical errors and even the job descriptions are not explained well or is completely different than your skillset and experience. Any authentic mail from a company or oil and gas recruitment agency will ensure an error-free, concise, and clear communication

Fee to conduct a job interview - No legitimate oil and gas company or recruitment agency will ever ask for money to conduct a job interview or to apply to job positions. If the mail says, the money will be refunded once you appear for a job interview, then please do not trust such claims as it is always bogus.

Asking for confidential personal information - Anyone asking for information that you will never put on CV, is a warning sign. It includes your bank details, passport copy, identity cards, your current residential details and so on. No genuine company will ever ask for such details before you sign the offer letter. If by chance, you have shared your bank details or another confidential detail to the scammer, contact your bank and email service provider and register a complaint against it.

Unknown source - There are countries who have strict spam rules and until you subscribe or give consent to the company, they cannot send you emails. So, if you receive an email from a company you haven’t contacted or have not applied for jobs, then be cautious it might be a scam.

The principle on which scammers operate is “Too good to be true”.  Don’t entertain any job offer that offers a position, you are not qualified for or offers a salary which is unrealistically high. In the oil and gas sector, be careful not to reveal your passport/work visa details to the scammer. Remember, if you find anything which is way beyond the realistic expectations, then trust your instincts and drop the offer and do not respond.

See our infographic below for a quick summarized glance -


 If you are looking for a job in the Energy sector then sign up today to stay updated with the latest industry news, apply for jobs and network - https://www.nrgedge.net/jobs 

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Infographic: Pros and Cons of App Based Talent Search in Oil and Gas


Searching for the right talent is often a tedious chore for the HR. However, with technological improvements, the usage of app-based recruitment has increased manifold. Recruiters and job seekers are increasingly adopting this new method. A mobile application simplifies the labor-intensive and time-consuming recruitment task and comes loaded with features that help to automate the recruitment cycle. For all the good, app-based approach can do, it still comes under fire from the critics. Here's our take on the pros & cons of App-based talent search.


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