Last Updated: August 21, 2017
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Four Strategic Global Business Leader Panels Will Feature Oil and Gas Industry’s Most Powerful Decision Makers

CEO Speakers Represent Multinational Oil Majors, National Oil Companies, Oilfield Services and Industry Finance


Abu Dhabi, UAE – 14 August 2017 – Delegates at this year’s Abu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition and Conference (ADIPEC) will have more opportunities than ever to hear some of the oil and gas industry’s most powerful executives speak in open-invite conference sessions, after organisers confirmed they will increase the number of Global Business Leader panels for 2017.

Held under the patronage of His Highness Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, President of the UAE, hosted by the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC), and organised by the Global Energy division of dmg events, ADIPEC has a successful history of attracting the industry’s top CEOs as speakers.

The separate Global Business Leader panels were launched in 2015 with two sessions. The positive response saw a third session added in 2016, and organisers will include a fourth panel discussion for 2017. With this year seeing ADIPEC expand to include downstream industries for the first time, an additional programme will include three Downstream Global Business Leader panels.

 “ADIPEC is unique for its ability to attract such a broad group of industry seniors to an annual event, driven by the market power of the region’s NOCs and their IOC partners,” said Ali Khalifa Al Shamsi, CEO, Al Yasat Petroleum Operations Co. Ltd and ADIPEC 2017 Chairman. “Nowhere else will industry professionals get such an insight into the strategic thinking guiding the industry forward, from individuals whose decisions are critical to the future of oil and gas businesses.”

With planning for ADIPEC entering its final weeks, organisers have confirmed the involvement of 13 CEOs for the Global Business Leader panels and are in talks with many more across the global industry. A further nine CEOs have been confirmed for the Downstream Global Business Leader programme.

Beyond the conference programme, CEOs convene at ADIPEC to do business and sign deals, offering conference delegates an opportunity not only to learn from the best, but also to grow their business and find new opportunities.

The confirmed CEO speakers include Bob Dudley, Group Chief Executive at UK-headquartered multinational, BP; Datuk Zulkiflee W. Ariffin, President and Group CEO of Malaysian national oil company, Petroliam Nasional Berhad (Petronas); Patrick Pouyanné, Chairman and CEO of France’s Total; Vagit Alekperov, President, Member of the Board of Directors, and Chairman of the Management Committee, at Russia’s Lukoil; Musabbeh Al Kaabi, CEO, Petroleum and Petrochemicals, Mubadala Investment Company; Mario Mehren, Chairman of the Board of Executive Directors, Wintershall; Toshiaki Kitamura, President and CEO at Japan’s INPEX Corporation; and Claudio Descalzi, CEO at Italian multinational, Eni.

Their individual perspectives include experience at some of the world’s largest vertically integrated oil and gas companies, including two of the industry ‘supermajors’, operating across a diverse range of international markets, both in terms of exploration and production, and in terms of sales.

They will be joined by the heads of three of the biggest international suppliers of oilfield services: David Dickson, President and Chief Executive Officer at McDermott; Mark McCollum, CEO at Weatherford, and Lorenzo Simonelli, President and CEO at Baker Hughes, a GE company.

Offering a regional perspective on oil and gas investment will be Mansour Al Mulla, Chief Financial Officer, Petroleum and Petrochemicals, Mubadala Investment Company, while Brian Gilvary, Group Chief Financial Officer at BP, will offer an international view.

“ADIPEC is the leading event for the global oil and gas industry, and that is reflected in the status of speakers we consistently attract for our conference programme,” said Christopher Hudson, President – Global Energy at dmg events. “The executives who have agreed to be part of our Global Business Leader panels are among those whose decisions shape the future of the industry, and who are most qualified to discuss the path forward for oil and gas in the coming years.”

With ADIPEC 2017 to be held under the theme ‘Forging Ties, Driving Growth’, the four Global Business Leader panels will focus on strategies that can deliver continuing business success, with discussion of the most pressing topics facing the sector today. There will also be a highly focused session on energy finance, investment, consolidation and diversification.

“The oil and gas industry continues to be a key driver for the global economy, but the market is changing, and industry leaders must respond,” said Hudson. “ADIPEC is a platform where businesses can share ideas that will help them evolve with the commercial environment. With our invited CEO speakers for 2017, we are placing greater emphasis on leaders with a truly global footprint. Their decisions will define the future for oil and gas: pioneering new ideas and breaking boundaries, fostering relationships, and building on momentum.”

More than 10,000 delegates, 2,200 exhibiting companies, 900 speakers, and in excess of 100,000 visitors, from 135 countries, are projected to gather in Abu Dhabi for ADIPEC 2017.

In its 20th edition, ADIPEC is firmly established as the world’s most influential oil and gas industry event, and the ADIPEC Conference Programme sets the standard for the exchange of best practice and operational excellence. Dedicated 2017 conference sessions include offshore and marine, women in energy and security in energy, along with global downstream technical sessions. The downstream sessions are new for this year, emphasising downstream expansion, diversification, integration, and technology innovation and R&D.

Other features include the ADIPEC Awards, which celebrate excellence in energy; Young ADIPEC, designed to encourage students to choose a career in energy; and the exclusive VIP programme briefings for members of the Middle East Petroleum Club.

ADIPEC will be held at Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre from 13 to 16 November 2017.


About ADIPEC

 Held under the patronage of the President of the United Arab Emirates, His Highness Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, and organised by the Global Energy division of dmg events, ADIPEC is the global meeting point for oil and gas professionals. Standing as one of the world’s top energy events, and the largest in the Middle East and North Africa, ADIPEC is a knowledge-sharing platform that enables industry experts to exchange ideas and information that shape the future of the energy sector. The 19th edition of ADIPEC 2016 took place from 7-10 November at the Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre (ADNEC). ADIPEC 2016 was supported by the UAE Ministry of Energy, Masdar, the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC), the Abu Dhabi Chamber, and the Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi). dmg Global Energy is committed to helping the growing international energy community bridge gaps by bringing oil and gas professionals face to face with new technologies and business opportunities.


For media enquiries, please contact:

Nour Soliman

Senior Marketing Manager, DMG Events Global Energy

Twofour54, Park Rotana Offices, 6th Floor

PO Box 769256, Abu Dhabi, UAE

T: +971 (0)2 6970 515

Wallis 

[email protected]

T: +971 4 275 4100

Mark Robinson (English):  +971 (0)55 127 9764

Feras Hamzah (Arabic):     +971 (0)50 798 4784

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Crude Oil Prices: Changing Gear

In the last week, global crude oil price benchmarks have leapt up by some US$5/b. Brent is now in the US$66/b range, while WTI maintains its preferred US$10/b discount at US$56/b. On the surface, it would seem that the new OPEC+ supply deal – scheduled to last until April – is working. But the drivers pushing on the current rally are a bit more complicated.

Pledges by OPEC members are the main force behind the rise. After displaying some reticence over the timeline of cuts, Russia has now promised to ‘speed up cuts’ to its oil production in line with other key members of OPEC. Saudi Arabia, along with main allies the UAE and Kuwait, have been at the forefront of this – having made deeper-than-promised cuts in January with plans to go a bit further in February. After looking a bit shaky – a joint Saudi Arabia-Russia meeting was called off at the recent World Economic Forum in Davos in January – the bromance of world’s two oil superpowers looks to have resumed. And with it, confidence in the OPEC+ club’s abilities.

Russia and Saudi Arabia both making new pledges on supply cuts comes despite supply issues elsewhere in OPEC, which could have provided some cushion for smaller cuts. Iranian production remains constrained by new American sanctions; targeted waivers have provided some relief – and indeed Iranian crude exports have grown slightly over January and February – but the waivers expire in May and there is uncertainty over their extension. Meanwhile, the implosion in Venezuela continues, with the USA slapping new sanctions on the Venezuelan crude complex in hopes of spurring regime change. The situation in Libya – with the Sharara field swinging between closure and operation due to ongoing militant action – is dicey. And in Saudi Arabia, a damaged power repair cable has curbed output at the giant 1.2 mmb/d Safaniuyah field.

So the supply situation is supportive of a rally, from both planned and unplanned actions. But crude prices are also reacting to developments in the wider geopolitical world. The USA and China are still locked in an impasse over trade, with a March 1 deadline looming, after which doubled US tariffs on US$200 billion worth of Chinese imports would kick in. Continued escalation in the trade war could lead to a global recession, or at least a severe slowdown. But the market is taking relief that an agreement could be made. First, US President Donald Trump alluded to the possibility of pushing the deadline by 2 months to allow for more talks. And now, chatter suggests that despite reservations, American and Chinese negotiators are now ‘approaching a consensus’. The threat of the R-word – recession – could be avoided and this is pumping some confidence back in the market. But there are more risks on the horizon. The UK is set to exit the European Union at the end of March, and there is still no deal in sight. A measured Brexit would be messy, but a no-deal Brexit would be chaotic – and that chaos would have a knock-on effect on global economies and markets.

But for now, the market assumes that there must be progress in US-China trade talks and the UK must fall in line with an orderly Brexit. If that holds – and if OPEC’s supply commitments stand – the rally in crude prices will continue. And it must. Because the alternative is frightening for all.

Factors driving the current crude rally:

  • Renewed supply cut pledges from Russia and Saudi Arabia
  • Unplanned supply outages in Saudi Arabia
  • Supply issues in Venezuela, Iran and Libya
  • Optimism over a new US-China trade deal
February, 22 2019
“Lubricants Shelf” to Assess Engine Oil Market

Already, lubricant players have established their footholds here in Bangladesh, with international brands.

However, the situation is being tough as too many brands entered in this market. So, it is clear, the lubricants brands are struggling to sustain their market shares.

For this reason, we recommend an impression of “Lubricants shelf” to evaluate your brand visibility, which can a key indicator of the market shares of the existing brands. 

Every retailer shop has different display shelves and the sellers place different product cans for the end-users. By nature, the sellers have the sole control of those shelves for the preferred product cans.

The idea of “Lubricants shelf” may give the marketer an impression, how to penetrate in this competitive market. 

The well-known lubricants brands automatically seized the product shelves because of the user demand. But for the struggling brands, this idea can be a key identifier of the business strategy to take over other brands.

The key objective of this impression of “Lubricants shelf” is to create an overview of your brand positioning in this competitive market.

A discussion on Lubricants Shelves; from the evaluation perspective, a discussion ground has been created to solely represent this trade, as well as its other stakeholders.

Why “Lubricants shelf” is key to monitor engine oil market?

The lubricants shelves of the overall market have already placed more than 100 brands altogether and the number of brands is increasing day by day.

And the situation is being worsened while so many by name products are taking the different shelves of different clusters. This market has become more overstated in terms of brand names and local products.

You may argue with us; lubricants shelves have no more space to place your new brands. You might get surprised by hearing such a statement. For your information, it’s not a surprising one.

Regularly, lubricants retailers have to welcome the representatives of newly entered brands.

And, business Insiders has depicted this lubricants market as a silent trade with a lot of floating traders.

On an assumption, the annual domestic demand for lubricants oils is around 100 million litres, whereas base oil demand around 140 million litres.

However, the lack of market monitoring and the least reporting makes the lubricants trade unnoticeable to the public.

February, 20 2019
Your Weekly Update: 11 - 15 February 2019

Market Watch

Headline crude prices for the week beginning 11 February 2019 – Brent: US$61/b; WTI: US$52/b

  • Oil prices remains entrenched in their trading ranges, with OPEC’s attempt to control global crude supplies mitigated by increasing concerns over the health of the global economy
  • Warnings, including from The Bank of England, point to a global economic slowdown that could be ‘worse and longer-lasting than first thought’; one of the main variables in this forecast are the trade tensions between the US and China, which show no sign of being solved with President Trump saying he is open to delaying the current deadline of March 1 for trade talks
  • This poorer forecast for global oil demand has offset supply issues flaring up within OPEC, with Libya reporting ongoing fighting at the country’s largest oilfield while the current political crisis in Venezuela could see its crude output drop to 700,000 b/d by 2020
  • The looming new American sanctions on Venezuelan crude has already had concrete results, with US refiner Marathon Petroleum moving to replace Venezuelan crude with similar grades from the Middle East and Latin America
  • While Nicolas Maduro holds on to power, Venezuela’s opposition leader Juan Guaido has promised to scrap requirements that PDVSA keep a controlling stake in domestic oil joint ventures and boost oil production through an open economy when his government-in-power takes over
  • Despite OPEC’s attempts to stabilise crude prices, the US House has advanced the so-called NOPEC bill – which could subject the cartel to antitrust action – to a vote, with a similar bill currently being debated in the US Senate
  • The see-saw pattern in the US active rig count continues; after a net loss of 14 rigs last week, the Baker Hughes rig survey reported a gain of 7 new oil rigs and a loss of 3 gas rigs for a net gain of 4 rigs
  • While demand is a concern, global crude supply remains delicate enough to edge prices up, especially with Saudi Arabia going for deeper-than-expected cuts; this should push Brent up towards US$64/b and WTI towards US$55/b in trading this week


Headlines of the week

Upstream

  • Egypt is looking to introduce a new type of oil and gas contract to attract greater upstream investment into the country, aiming to be ‘less bureaucratic and more efficient’ with faster cost-recovery, ahead of a planned Red Sea bid round encompassing over a dozen concession sites
  • Lukoil has commenced on a new phase at the West Qurna-2 field in Iraq, with 57 production wells planned at the Mishrif and Yamama formation that could boost output by 80,000 boe/d to 480,000 boe/d in 2020
  • Aker BP has hit oil and natural gas flows at well 24/9-14 in the Froskelår Main prospect in the Alvheim area of the Norwergian Continental Shelf
  • Things continue to be rocky for crude producers in Canada’s Alberta province; production limits were increased last week after being previously slashed to curb a growing glut on news that crude storage levels dropped, but now face trouble being transported south as pipelines remain at capacity and crude-by-rail shipments face challenging economics

Midstream & Downstream

  • The Caribbean island of Curacao is now speaking with two new candidates to operate the 335 kb/d Isla refinery after its preferred bidder – said to be Saudi Aramco’s American arm Motiva Enterprises – withdrew from consideration to replace the current operatorship under PDVSA
  • America’s Delta Air Lines is now reportedly looking to sell its oil refinery in Pennsylvania outright, after attempts to sell a partial stake in the 185 kb/d plant failed to attract interest, largely due to its limited geographical position

Natural Gas/LNG

  • Total reports that it has made a new ‘significant’ gas condensate discovery offshore South Africa at the Brulpadda prospect in Block 11B/12B in the Outeniqua Basin, with the Brulpadda-deep well also reporting ‘successful’ flows of natural gas condensate
  • Italy’s Eni and Saudi Arabia’s SABIC have signed a new Joint Development Agreement to collaborate on developing technologies for gas-to-liquids and gas-to-chemicals applications
  • The Rovuma LNG project in Mozambique is charging ahead with development, with Eni looking to contract out subsea operations for the Mamba gas project by mid-March and ExxonMobil choosing its contractor for building the complex’s LNG trains by April
February, 15 2019