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Career Development
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Hard work and skills are crucial to a career from the first interview through to senior management. But a passion for people at work and in our society puts magic into one’s life.


By Anas Alam Faizli


I still remember getting the shock of my life when I arrived at Asia’s southernmost tip, or as some will argue, second southernmost tip. The place looked barren and when I saw a bauxite site, it struck me that this was exactly what I learnt back in geography class – there’s plenty of bauxite in Teluk Ramunia but it is still nothing compared to what we are seeing now in Kuantan!

I had no idea what I was going into. A quick Altavista (there was no Google back then) search had given me just the information that the company is in the business of jacket fabrication. Jacket fabrication? I was pretty sure the company wasn’t doing a clothing line.

At the time, I was in my final semester at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia for my Bachelor’s degree. At the beginning of that semester, I had started looking for a job. I started early because I was worried I would be unemployed after graduation. During semester breaks and sometimes even when uni was in session, I worked part time with various employers hoping to lessen the burden on my parents. Being the eldest of 10 children, that would be the least I could do.

The interview went well and I got the job as a management trainee with Sime Sembcorp Engineering, a leading fabricator of offshore platforms.

Taking the job shocked many of my friends considering I did my internship with IBM and everybody thought I was going to be a computer whiz. At 19, I participated in an open source exhibition and hung out with IT savvy professionals. No one expected me to be in Oil and Gas. I guess I didn’t want to end up servicing computers and wanted to be in a more niche industry.

So after my final exam, I started my first job in the Oil and Gas industry. I spent two long years on an extremely steep learning curve in various disciplines from engineering, planning, safety, heavy lifting, construction and most importantly, project management.

I would say that one of the most challenging tasks of the job was supervising colleagues who had more than 15 years of experience in the field. I was fresh out of college and it was probably the first time I saw the worth of a degree. Suffice to say, I was not the most popular bloke in Teluk Rumania.

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There were monthly expeditions to Batam, Indonesia to expedite delivery of plates and tubular; and a trip to Germany, Amsterdam and France to expedite structural steel and electrical cables for a project we were tasked with.

I was also fortunate to be entrusted by my colleagues as a tuition teacher to their little ones – teaching Maths, Science and English in the small village of Teluk Ramunia after office hours.

Time flies. On 10 August 2004, I saw the biggest pair of dark brown eyes looking back at me. I smiled as I recited the Azan in my daughter’s ears. An hour later, Petronas Carigali called me for an interview.

I was met with a killer question during the interview: “You don’t have six years of experience and you’re not an engineer. You don’t qualify. Did you falsify your resume?”

I was about to walk out. Apparently the manpower agency included all my experience even after SPM when I was writing a weekly column for the Malay Mail and doing the website for Hijau Inovasi. They even listed out all my part-time jobs in university.

Nonetheless, I wanted to prove my worth and assail all doubts. I got the job as a Senior Project Controller through contractual employment. Immediately after singing Leaving On A Jet Plane on my HSE day, I was hitting the road again. Thank you, Sime Sembcorp. PETRONAS here I come!

The rest is history. I now belong in oil and gas.

I spent two years with Carigali doing Conceptual and Front End Engineering Design including Fabrication for the Abu Cluster project before joining Talisman Malaysia. Talisman made me an offer I couldn’t refuse. An overseas assignment – a whole new world of experience.

I picked up Vietnamese, learnt real people management skills and did my best for two years in Vung Tau, Vietnam. The Vietnamese are different – they have strong character and don’t easily admit their weaknesses.

After completing my stint in Vietnam, I spent another two years working offshore for Installation, Hook-Up and Commissioning in Malaysia-Vietnam borders.

The years offshore were tough – I worked hard in the day and studied at night for my Master’s degree in project management.

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Back to shore, I was sent to Kemaman as Talisman’s sole company representative to oversee three fabrication yards, one in KSB, one in Teluk Kemang and the third, a yard belonging to EPIC. Here, I strengthened my management and supervision skills. I believe in building a strong relationship with the team. Team building is crucial in executing any plan.

By New Year’s Eve in 2011, I was finally called back to the KL office for project development coordination work.

Now, it is interaction between the sub-surface, drilling and the operations and intensive meets with the senior management and also the Calgary office. I have now completed my upstream oil and gas cycle, covering all its phases.

Four years in opportunity evaluation, project planning and development activities while completing my doctorate part-time. A doctorate in business administration would be crucial to enter the corporate world. I needed a formal education to force myself to learn business and economy.

The years as a tuition teacher providing free education in Teluk Ramunia led me to lead an education volunteer organisation called Teach For The Needs (TFTN) in 2013. At its peak, there were 1,500 volunteers serving 20 orphanages. My corporate experience was fully utilised to help structure the organisation and its day to day operations. The leadership baton has been handed to younger leaders and it is now a well-known name in the civil society organisations.

Together with other concerned citizens, I had also co-founded an economic think tank called BLINDSPOT. One can say the term signifies the many things we missed in the quest for economic success. We raised issues of Inequality and how we can improve to reduce the gap for a better Malaysia.

Despite my punishing work schedule, I had wanted to write my thoughts on Malaysia and this I did through my book Rich Malaysia, Poor Malaysians published by Gerakbudaya in 2014.

I spent 10 good years – mostly under the blazing sun, and then some, with Talisman.

Now, I’m with Eversendai in a senior management role in charge of Business Development and Special Projects including an Oil and Gas setup. Eversendai is a true Malaysian success story. The founder is a living inspiration.

Here, a new world awaits, where the organisation is a world leading heavy steel specialist and is in the construction of high-rise buildings, infrastructure and power plants. The PETRONAS Twin Towers and the Burj Khalifa are among its list of accomplishments.

It feels like a long, tumultuous and fruitful journey. I am fortunate to have made it this far and I hope to carve out more illustrious years ahead. Yet, despite all the “achievements”, I strongly believe that you have to give back to society and that one can contribute in many ways.

Recently, the Malaysian Government through the Ministry of Human Resource appointed me as an Oil and Gas Industry Expert. I hope to contribute so much more to, and through, the industry.



*This article was first published on April 2016 on Resource Magazine and is reprinted here with full permission from the writer.

**About the Writer:
Anas Alam Faizli, is Director, Business Development and Special Projects at Eversendai Corporation Berhad. When he’s not working, he spends his time with his adorable and beautiful daughter.

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U.S. renewable electricity generation has doubled since 2008

U.S. annual renewable generation

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Electric Power Monthly

Renewable generation provided a new record of 742 million megawatthours (MWh) of electricity in 2018, nearly double the 382 million MWh produced in 2008. Renewables provided 17.6% of electricity generation in the United States in 2018.

Nearly 90% of the increase in U.S. renewable electricity between 2008 and 2018 came from wind and solar generation. Wind generation rose from 55 million MWh in 2008 to 275 million MWh in 2018 (6.5% of total electricity generation), exceeded only by conventional hydroelectric at 292 million MWh (6.9% of total generation).

U.S. solar generation has increased from 2 million MWh in 2008 to 96 million MWh in 2018. Solar generation accounted for 2.3% of electricity generation in 2018. Solar generation is generally categorized as small-scale (customer-sited or rooftop) solar installations or utility-scale installations. In 2018, 69% of solar generation, or 67 million MWh, was utility-scale solar.

U.S. annual net generation, wind and solar

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Electric Power Monthly

Increases in U.S. wind and solar generation are driven largely by capacity additions. In 2008, the United States had 25 gigawatts (GW) of wind generating capacity. By the end of 2018, 94 GW of wind generating capacity was operating on the electric grid. Almost all of this capacity is onshore; one offshore wind plant, located on Block Island, off the coast of Rhode Island, has a capacity of 30 megawatts. Similarly, installed solar capacity grew from an estimated less than 1 GW in 2008 to 51 GW in 2018. In 2018, 1.8 GW of this solar capacity was solar thermal, 30 GW was utility-scale solar photovoltaics (PV), and the remaining 20 GW was small-scale solar PV.

Growth in renewable technologies in the United States, particularly in wind and solar, has been driven by federal and state policies and declining costs. Federal policies such as the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009 and the Production Tax Credit and Investment Tax Credits for wind and solar have spurred project development.

In addition, state-level policies, such as renewable portfolio standards, which require a certain share of electricity to come from renewable sources, have increasing targets over time. As more wind and solar projects have come online, economies of scale have led to more efficient project development and financing mechanisms, which has led to continued cost declines.

Conventional hydroelectric capacity has remained relatively unchanged in the United States, increasing by 2% since 2008. Changes in hydroelectric generation year-over-year typically reflect changes in precipitation and drought conditions. Between 2008 and 2018, annual U.S. hydroelectric generation was as low as 249 million MWh and as high as 319 million MWh, with hydroelectric generation in 2018 totaling 292 million MWh. Generation from other renewable resources, including biomass and geothermal, increased from 70 million MWh to 79 million MWh in the United States between 2008 and 2018, and it collectively represented 1.9% of total generation in 2018.

March, 20 2019
Your Weekly Update: 11 - 15 March 2019

Market Watch

Headline crude prices for the week beginning 11 March 2019 – Brent: US$66/b; WTI: US$56/b

  • Global crude oil prices continue to remain rangebound despite bearish factors emerging
  • News that Libya was restarting its 300,000 b/d Sharara field could weaken the ability of OPEC to control supply, while a report from the US EIA hints that the market was moving into a glut
  • The EIA report showed that commercial crude inventories in the US rose by 7.1 million barrels, far higher than the 1.6 million barrel increase predicted, with a 873,000 barrel increase at Cushing and a 12% y-o-y drop in crude imports
  • By the end of 2019, with American output surging and Saudi Arabia curtailing production, the US could export more oil and liquids than the world’s largest exporter
  • Meanwhile in OPEC, PDVSA has received some aid from Russia with Rosneft agreeing to send heavy naphtha to Venezuela – a product necessary to thin heavy Venezuela crude to move by pipeline to the coast that have been affected by the American sanctions
  • On the demand side, Morgan Stanley has predicted that China’s oil consumption will peak in 2025, some 5-8 years earlier than most expectations, driven by a shift in cars towards electric vehicles and high-speed rail
  • The US active rig count fell for a third consecutive week, following a 9 rig fall with an 11 rig drop last week, with nine oil sites and two gas sites scrapped
  • Despite the bearish factors, it looks like crude has found a new comfortable range with Brent at US$65-67/b and WTI at US$56-58/b for the week


Headlines of the week

Upstream

  • Despite security concerns, Libya has restarted its largest oil field, with output at 300,000 b/d Sharara expected to reach 80,000 b/d initially, throwing a new spanner in the OPEC goal of controlling supply
  • A one-year delay to Enbridge’s Line 3 conduit in Canada due to regulatory issues has thrown new troubles onto Alberta’s beleaguered crude industry
  • ExxonMobil is planning a major acceleration of its Permian assets, aiming to produce more than 1 mmboe/d by 2024, an increase of nearly 80%
  • China has announced plans to form a national oil and pipeline company, part of a natural energy industry overhaul that will give the new firm control over at least 112,000 km of oil, gas and fuel pipelines currently held by other state firms
  • Equinor, with Petoro, ConocoPhillips and Repsol, have announced a new oil discovery in the North Sea, with the Telesto well on the Visund A platform potentially yielding 12-28 million barrels of recoverable oil
  • Aker Energy has reported a new oil discovery at the Pecan South-1A well offshore Ghana, with the Pecan field expected to hold 450-550 mboe of oil
  • Production declines at Kazakhstan’s three main oil fields will see the country slash crude exports by 2% to 71 million tons this year, with cuts mostly to China

Midstream & Downstream

  • Canadian Natural Resources is looking to ease pressure on the Alberta crude complex by bringing its 80 kb/d North West Redwater refinery online this year
  • Work has begun on the upgrade and expansion of Egypt’s Middle East Oil Refinery near Alexandria, with the project expected to boost capacity to 160 kb/d and quality to Euro V through the installation of a new CDU and VDU
  • Bahrain’s BAPCO has announced plans to expand its Sitra oil refinery by early 2023, growing capacity from 267 kb/d to 360 kb/d

Natural Gas/LNG

  • India has started up its first LNG regasification facility on the east coast, with the Ennore terminal expected to service the major cities of Chennai and Madurai
  • Total has signed an agreement with Russia’s Novatek for the formal acquisition of a 10% stake in the Arctic LNG 2 project, bringing its total economic interest in the 19.8 mtpa project in the Yamal and Gydan peninsuals to 21.6%
  • Thailand’s PTTEP has announced a new offshore gas find in Australia’s portion of the Timor Sea, with the Orchid-1 well striking gas and expected to be incorporated into the Cash-Maple field with 3.5 tcf of resources
  • Crescent Petroleum and Dana Gas’s joint venture Pearl Petroleum Company is aiming to boost gas production at Khor Mor block in Iraq’s Kurdistan region by 63% with an additional 250 mmscf/d of output
  • Petronas’ 1.2 mtpa PFLNG Satu – the world’s first floating LNG vessel – has completed its stint at the Kanowit field and will now head to its second destination, the Kebabangan gas field offshore Sabah
  • Chevron is looking to revisit its Ubon wet gas project in Thailand after a period of hiatus as the supermajor recalibrated its development costs
  • Nigeria’s NLNG Train 7 LNG project is expected to reach FID in the third quarter of the year after multiple delays
  • ExxonMobil and BP have agreed to collaborate with the Alaska Gasline Development Corporation to advance the Alaska LNG project
  • Energean Oil and Gas has started its 2019 drilling programme in Israel, focusing on four wells, including one in Karish North near the Karish discovery
March, 15 2019
Latest issue of GEO ExPro magazine covers New Technologies and Training Geoscientists, with a geographical focus on Australasia and South East Asia

GEO ExPro Vol. 16, No. 1 was published on 4th March 2019 bringing light to the latest science and technology activity in the global geoscience community within the oil, gas and energy sector.

This issue focuses on new technologies available to the oil and gas industry and how they can be adapted to improve hydrocarbon exploration workflows and understanding around the world. The latest issue of GEO ExPro magazine also covers current training methods for educating geoscientists, with articles highlighting the essential pre-drill ‘toolbox’ and how we can harness virtual reality to bring world class geological locations to the classroom.

You can download the PDF of GEO ExPro magazine for FREE and sign up to GEO ExPro’s weekly updates and online exclusives to receive the latest articles direct to your inbox.

Download GEO ExPro Vol. 16, No. 1

March, 14 2019