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Last week in World oil:

Prices

  • Oil prices got a boost, within striking distance of US$60/b, as major producers say that the global supply glut is shrinking as strong demand creates a rebalancing, as well as threats by Turkey to cut off Kurdistan’s only pipeline outlet for its crude oil over its independence referendum.

Upstream

  • As Lebanon seeks to join Cyprus, Egypt and Israel in exploiting potential offshore oil and gas resources, its Parliament has approved a law outlining tax revenue structure for oil companies, as Lebanon prepares for its first offshore auction. Five offshore areas will be offered on October 12, to be taxed at 20% income tax under the new law; 46 companies have signed up for the auctions, including ExxonMobil, Shell, Eni and Total.
  • A third consecutive week of decline for US drillers, as the loss of five oil rigs was only partially offset by the gain of four gas rigs. Losses were mainly in Eagle Ford, while restarts begin in the Permian.

Downstream & Midstream

  • Phillips 66 Partners LP – the master limited partnership that operates pipelines in the Bakken basin – will buy midstream assets from its parent Phillips 66 in a US$2.4 billion deal. Under the deal, Phillips 66 Partners will acquire a 25% interest in the Dakota Access and Energy Transfer Crude Oil Company LLCs – totalling 530 kb/d of crude oil pipeline capacity. With both companies listed separately, this leaves Phillips 66 free to concentrate on refining operations, and the MLP on distribution.
  • After Harvey and Irma – and with Maria on its way – the resulting gap in Gulf refining production is proving to be a boon for European diesel exports to Latin America. Trade sources indicate that some 600,000 tons of diesel and heating oil will be heading to Brazil and Argentina from Europe, as the fuel hungry region finds volumes from its traditional sources in the US Gulf and Caribbean withdrawn. This is some three times the usual trade, and is expected to continue until end October.

Natural Gas and LNG

  • Cheniere has officially requested permission from the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to place the fourth train at its Sabine Pass LNG export facility in Louisiana into service. First LNG was achieved at Train 4 in July, checking off all environmental and safety requirements. Cargo commissioning has already begun, bringing Cheniere close to its ambition of six trains at Sabine Pass, each with 4.5 mtpa capacity.
  • Algeria’s Sonatrach is aiming to boost gas output at its Hassi Messaoud field by 10 mcm/d and at its Rhourde el Baguel oil field by 6 mcm/d. This attempt to up output comes as Sonatrach seeks buffer against fluctuating oil prices to stabilise government revenues. The additional volumes will come on by next year, targeted as exports to Europe.
  • Canada’s Veresen is trying once again to gain US federal approval for its Jordan Cove LNG export plant in Oregon. The project has been rejected twice under the Obama administration, but the Trump presidency might be friendlier to the US$10 billion, 7.8 mtpa project targeting Asia. Meanwhile, the Eagle LNG Maxvillesmall-scale LNG facility in Florida has been approved, with capacity for some 21 mtpa of exports.

Last week in Asian oil

Upstream

  • Saudi Aramco is moving ahead with the development of its Safaniyah, Marjan, Zuluf and Berri oilfields, handing out more than US$1.5 billion in three major offshore contracts as it continues on a US$300 billion investment plan through 2027. The technical contracts precede major development plans for the fields, which include the sixth phase of the giant Safaniyah field (with 37 billion barrels of heavy oil), a US$3 billion expansion of Marjan and a boost in production at Berri by 200 kb/d.
  • India’s ONGC has announced a ‘good’ offshore find near its Mumbai High offshore fields that could hold some 20 million tons of oil equivalent. Though small by international standards, it is a large discovery in India terms, with the WO 24-3 well in a different play than neighbouring Mumbai High fields, potentially opening up a new area of exploration.

Downstream & Midstream

  • Sri Lanka is in talks with the two Chinese companies to build a US$3 billion oil refinery in the new Chinese-build port of Hambantota. The proposed 115 kb/d is the second of two planned refineries in Sri Lanka, to ease pressure on the aging CPC refinery. The first, a 100 kb/d site planned with Indian Oil in Trincomalee is export-oriented, while the new Chinese site will serve both domestic needs and produce some exports.
  • A jet fuel crisis continues to brew in New Zealand, as over 200 flights have been cancelled from Auckland – the country’s largest city – as the sole, private-owned pipeline delivering jet fuel to the airport from NZ’s sole refinery was damaged for months without being fixed.

Natural Gas & LNG

  • The government of Papua New Guinea will be selling off its stake in Oil Search, as it seeks to pay off some US$1 billion in debt. With stakes in PNG’s massive Elk and Antelope gas fields, Australia’s Oil Search has a major presence in PNG, though it was beaten out by ExxonMobil to acquire InterOil earlier this year. The PNG government holds a 9.8% stake in the company, which will be sold by UBS and JP Morgan at a floor price of A$6.55 per share.
  • Bangladesh signed its fourth and fifth natural gas import deals last week, with Indonesia and Gunvor. Under the preliminary long-term agreement with Indonesia’s Pertamina, Petrobangla will take in at least 1 million mtpa of LNG from Indonesia, while the contract with Gunvor is for a mixture of spot, short-term and medium-term volumes, beginning in 2018. Bangladesh has also signed a contract with Qatar to import some 2.5 mtpa of LNG from RasGas over a 15 year period for cooking fuel.
  • China’s CNOOC is reviving a plan to build an LNG import terminal in Binhai, Jiangsu. Initially proposed in 2010, the US$1.7 billion project has been endorsed by CNOOC’s investment committee as China’s appetite for LNG continues to grow. The project has an initial capacity of 3 mtpa of LNG, with a potential phase doubling capacity to 6 mtpa. Associated power generation facility will be included in the project as well.
  • Japan’s Mitsui OSK Lines is aiming to buy a stake of at least 26% in the Swan Energy FSRU off the coast of Jafrabad in Gujarat, Insia. With capacity for 5 mtpa and startup expected in 2020, the FSRU is being built by Hyundai Heavy Industries and chartered to Swan Energy by Mitsui OSK. The Japanese company will also be taking an 11% stake in Swan LNG, the Swan Energy subsidiary that will manage terminal and port facilities.

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Leading Countries and Region wise Share in the Oilfield Scale Inhibitor Market

The global oilfield scale inhibitor market was valued at USD 509.4 Million in 2014 and is expected to witness a CAGR of 5.40% between 2015 and 2020. Factors driving the market of oilfield scale inhibitor include increasing demand from the oil and gas industry, wide availability of scale inhibitors, rising demand for biodegradable and environment-compatible scale inhibitors, and so on.

Download PDF Brochure @ https://www.marketsandmarkets.com/pdfdownloadNew.asp?id=268225660

 The oilfield scale inhibitor market is experiencing strong growth and is mainly driven by regions, such as RoW, North America, Asia-Pacific, and Europe. Considerable amount of investments are made by different market players to serve the end-user applications of scale inhibitors. The global market is segmented into major geographic regions, such as North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and Rest of the World (RoW). The market has also been segmented on the basis of type. On the basis of type of scale inhibitors, the market is sub-divided into phosphonates, carboxylate/acrylate, sulfonates, and others. 

Carboxylate/acrylic are the most common type of oilfield scale inhibitor

Among the various types of scale inhibitors, the carboxylate/acrylate type holds the largest share in the oilfield scale inhibitor market. This large share is attributed to the increasing usage of this type of scale inhibitors compared to the other types. Carboxylate/acrylate meets the legislation requirement, abiding environmental norms due to the absence of phosphorus. Carboxylate/acrylate scale inhibitors are used in artificial cooling water systems, heat exchangers, and boilers.

RoW, which includes the Middle-East, Africa, and South America, is the most dominant region in the global oilfield scale inhibitor market

The RoW oilfield scale inhibitor market accounted for the largest share of the global oilfield scale inhibitor market, in terms of value, in 2014. This dominance is expected to continue till 2020 due to increased oil and gas activities in this region. The Middle-East, Africa, and South America have abundant proven oil and gas reserves, which will enable the rapid growth of the oilfield scale inhibitor market in these regions. Among the regions in RoW, Africa’s oilfield scale inhibitor market has the highest prospect for growth. Africa has a huge amount of proven oil reserves and is one of the leading oil producing region in the World. But political unrest coupled with lack of proper infrastructures may negatively affect oil and gas activities in this region.

Major players in this market are The Dow Chemical Company (U.S.), BASF SE (Germany), AkzoNobel Oilfield (The Netherlands), Kemira OYJ (Finland), Solvay S.A. (Belgium), Halliburton Company (U.S.), Schlumberger Limited (U.S.), Baker Hughes Incorporated (U.S.), Clariant AG (Switzerland), E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (U.S.), Evonik Industries AG (Germany), GE Power & Water Process Technologies (U.S.), Ashland Inc. (U.S.), and Innospec Inc. (U.S.). 

Speak to Analyst @ https://www.marketsandmarkets.com/speaktoanalystNew.asp?id=268225660

Scope of the Report:

  • By Type:
    • Phosphonates
    • Carboxylate/Acrylate
    • Sulfonates
    • Others
      • Polymaleic Acid
      • Synthetic Polymeric Acid
      • Polyaspartate
      • Phosphinopolyacrylate
      • Carboxy Methyl Inulin
  • By Region:
    • North America
      • U.S.
      • Canada
      • Mexico
    • Europe
      • Western Europe
      • Eastern Europe
      • Southern Europe
    • Asia-Pacific
      • China
      • India
    • RoW
      • Middle-East
      • Africa
      • South America

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December, 13 2019
Your Weekly Update: 9 - 13 December 2019

Market Watch  

Headline crude prices for the week beginning 9 December 2019 – Brent: US$64/b; WTI: US$59/b

  • The recent adjustment to the OPEC+ supply deal may not have been enough to convince the market completely, but a deal is still better than no deal; with the club coordinating to formalise the existing level of production as cuts, crude prices capped off a week of gains but failed to move higher
  • The new supply quotas include a reduction of 500,000 b/d across OPEC+, though this does not remove additional barrels from the market but rather seals in the current level of production, where Saudi Arabia is overcompensating for non-compliance elsewhere; the challenge now is also to ‘equitably redistribute’ the Saudi burden among other members
  • Saudi Arabia also pledged an additional voluntary cut of 400,000 b/d, provided all OPEC+ members meet their own quotas; compliance did, however, get easier as the club agreed to remove condensate from the crude quotas, benefitting Russia
  • The new supply deal will only stay in place until March 2020 – not quite enough time to resolve the supply glut – but OPEC is also betting that the relentless rise in American crude production will slow down in 2020
  • There is a reason to believe this, given the sharp decline in American drilling activities; but debt-laden US shale drillers might actually do the opposite – accelerate drilling to produce more oil to stave off their creditors
  • There are hints that a US-China trade deal might be coming soon, as China agreed to stop the planned implementation of tariffs on US goods due to kick on December 15; a deal cannot happen soon enough, with reports that Chinese exports to the US fell by 23% y-o-y, flagging up worries about oil demand
  • OPEC’s attempt to expand its influence by courting Brazil to its membership has been rebuffed by Petrobras, with its CEO stating that he is ‘against cartels’
  • In. the US, the EIA reports that the US moved to be a net exporter of crude and petroleum products for the first time since 1973 – aided by growth in crude and refined product exports, with imports largely flat
  • The US active rig count fell below 800 for the first time in 32 months, shedding 5 oil rigs but gaining 2 gas ones for a net loss of 3; the rig count is now down 276 from 1,075 sites working a year ago
  • OPEC’s headline agreement will prop up oil prices, but since details of the new ‘distribution’ of cuts is not yet clear, there will be no appetite for the market to allow crude to break out beyond their range; Brent is expected to stay in the US$64-65/b range, while WTI will stay at the US$59-60/b range


Headlines of the week

Upstream

  • Apache’s closely watched Maka-1 oil well – adjacent to ExxonMobil’s massive Liza field– is going for a third test drill, raising suspicions that Maka-1 could prove to be a bust, dashing hopes of Suriname emulating Guyana’s success
  • Following Murphy Oil and ExxonMobil’s exit from Malaysian upstream, oilfield service provider Petrofac is also mulling an exit, selling its assets – which include a stake in the PM304 field – for US$300 million
  • Libya and Turkey have agreed to a potentially contentious maritime deal demarcating their nautical exclusive economic zones, setting both countries up for a showdown with Greece, Cyprus, and Egypt over exploration rights
  • Repsol’s upstream arm is the first oil major to align its business goals with the Paris climate change accord, aiming to eliminate all net greenhouse gas emissions from its own operations and customers by 2050 – with a change in focus away from output growth towards value generation and clean energy
  • Canadian oil sands producers in Alberta are looking at new ways to export their crude, which would involve removing condensate, light oils and other diluents from the oil sands, and shipping the heavier latter by more cost-effective rail
  • UK independent EnQuest has been awarded 85% of the offshore Block PM409 PSC in Peninsular Malaysia, with Petronas Carigali holding the remaining 15%
  • Fresh from the success of starting up the giant Johan Sverdrup oilfield ahead of schedule, Equinor now estimates that it will be able to raise recoverable reserves from the field from 2.7 billion boe to 3.2 billion boe

Midstream/Downstream

  • PDVSA has reached a deal with Curacao to operate the 335,000 Isla refinery for another year, extending a contract that was set to expire at the end of 2019, but the new arrangement has been described as a  ‘transition’ by Curacao
  • Turkey’s state sovereign wealth fund – the Turkish Wealth Fund – will be investing some US$10 billion to build a new integrated refinery and petrochemicals complex in Adana, with construction expected to begin in 2021
  • Sonangol has terminated its contract with Hong Kong-based consortium United Shine to plan to build its new 60,000 b/d Cabinda refinery in Angola but will seek new investors and partners to go ahead with the project

Natural Gas/LNG

  • First gas has begun to flow into Sempra’s Cameron LNG Train 2 in Louisiana, marking the start of the final commissioning stage of the phase that will eventually incorporate 3 trains with 12 million tpa capacity
  • The Power of Siberia natural gas pipeline – connecting Russia and China – has launched, which will deliver up to 38 bcm of natural gas annually for 30 years to CNPC and Chinese customers from the enormous gas fields in eastern Siberia
  • After years spent getting Kitimat LNG in Canada’s BC off the ground, Chevron will be selling its 50% stake in the project – part of a broader retreat from natural gas amid a bleak price outlook – adding new woes to the troubled project
  • Prior to Chevron’s decision to exit Kitimat LNG, Canada’s Energy Regulator has doubled the timeframe of the project’s export license – allowing it to export up to 18 million tpa of LNG (up from 10 million tpa previously) for 40 years
  • ExxonMobil has shelved plans to build an LNG import terminal in Australia’s Victoria state after failing to secure enough buyers for the project
  • Train 1 at the Freeport LNG export terminal in Texas has begun operations, with Train 2 and Train 3 expected next year for a full capacity of 15 mtpa
December, 13 2019
EIA analysis explores India’s projected energy consumption

In the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) International Energy Outlook 2019 (IEO2019), India has the fastest-growing rate of energy consumption globally through 2050. By 2050, EIA projects in the IEO2019 Reference case that India will consume more energy than the United States by the mid-2040s, and its consumption will remain second only to China through 2050. EIA explored three alternative outcomes for India’s energy consumption in an Issue in Focus article released today and a corresponding webinar held at 9:00 a.m. Eastern Standard Time.

Long-term energy consumption projections in India are uncertain because of its rapid rate of change magnified by the size of its economy. The Issue in Focus article explores two aspects of uncertainty regarding India’s future energy consumption: economic composition by sector and industrial sector energy intensity. When these assumptions vary, it significantly increases estimates of future energy consumption.

In the IEO2019 Reference case, EIA projects the economy of India to surpass the economies of the European countries that are part of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the United States by the late 2030s to become the second-largest economy in the world, behind only China. In EIA’s analysis, gross domestic product values for countries and regions are expressed in purchasing power parity terms.

The IEO2019 Reference case shows India’s gross domestic product (GDP) growing from $9 trillion in 2018 to $49 trillion in 2050, an average growth rate of more than 5% per year, which is higher than the global average annual growth rate of 3% in the IEO2019 Reference case.

gross domestic product of selected countries and regions

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, International Energy Outlook 2019

India’s economic growth will continue to drive India’s growing energy consumption. In the IEO2019 Reference case, India’s total energy consumption increases from 35 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2018 to 120 quadrillion Btu in 2050, growing from a 6% share of the world total to 13%. However, annually, the level of GDP in India has a lower energy consumption than some other countries and regions.

total energy consumption in selected countries and regions

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, International Energy Outlook 2019

In the Issue in Focus, three alternative cases explore different assumptions that affect India’s projected energy consumption:

  • Composition case: EIA assumes India’s economy shifts toward further growth in manufacturing, which increases energy consumption.
  • Technology case: EIA assumes India’s industrial technology does not advance as quickly as in the IEO2019 Reference case, resulting in greater energy use.
  • Combination case: EIA combines the assumptions in the Composition and Technology cases.

EIA’s analysis shows that the country's industrial activity has a greater effect on India’s energy consumption than technological improvements. In the IEO2019 Composition and Combination cases, where the assumption is that economic growth is more concentrated in manufacturing, energy use in India grows at a greater rate because those industries have higher energy intensities.

In the IEO2019 Combination case, India’s industrial energy consumption grows to 38 quadrillion Btu more in 2050 than in the Reference case. This difference is equal to a more than 4% increase in 2050 global energy use.

December, 13 2019