NrgEdge Editor

Sharing content and articles for users
Last Updated: October 20, 2017
1 view
Business Trends
image

Last week in World oil:

Prices

  • Crude prices remain stuck in their range – Brent at US$57/b and WTI at US$51/b – as swings in US inventories outweigh Middle Eastern geopolitical concerns, with little on to horizon to move the market. 

Upstream

  • Chinese major Sinopec is planning to exit Argentina, after losses and labour woes prompted it to put its oil assets on sale. Acquired in 2010 from Occidental Petroleum for US$2.45 billion, the acquisition was part of Sinopec’s drive to establish a portfolio of international upstream assets. However, a shaky political and economic situation in Argentina caused losses, and the oil and gas assets – mainly in the southern province of Santa Cruz – now have a price estimate of US$750 million-1 billion.
  • Uganda is quickly becoming a potential new African upstream bright spot, with Nigeria’s Oranto Petroleum recently signing two PSCs to explore around the Lake Albert basin. The Ngassa Shallow Play and Ngassa Deep Play are located within the Albertine rift basin where Uganda first struck oil in 2006; Uganda’s first domestic oil is expected in 2020.
  • Cote d’Ivoire has concluded four PSCs with Tullow Oil in a bid to jumpstart its fledgling upstream industry. Producing a mere 8 kb/d of oil and 200 mcf/d of gas, Cote d’Ivoire lags behind Senegal and Ghana, but is hoping that recent big finds in its neighbours hint at potential within its waters. State oil firm Petroci will hold 10% of each PSC.
  • US drillers cut active rig counts for the fourth time in five weeks, as price realities impact production plans. Eight rigs were removed from service last week – five oil and three gas – leaving the total active count at 928.

Downstream & Midstream

  • Another international joins the queue to exploit Mexico’s recently deregulated fuel retail industry, joining Shell, BP, ExxonMobil and Glencore. France’s Total is expanding its downstream presence in Mexico from specialty products to a full service station network, rebranding some 250 Mexico City-area GASORED group sites to the Total brand. The first site will be opened in late 2017, rolling out over 2018 and 2019. 

Natural Gas and LNG

  • More LNG this way comes. A week after Chevron began operations at Wheatstone, Russia’s Yamal LNG project in the Arctic confirmed that it will ship its first LNG cargo in November. Operated by Russia’s Novatek with France’s Total, China’s CNPC and the Silk Road Fund, Yamal will begin with two shipments in November, four in December, then ramp up to ten in 2018. The first cargoes were reportedly sold on the spot market.

Corporate

  • Indications are the Saudi Aramco’s planned IPO has hit some snags. Recent reports indicate that some delays are expected, with a two-stage IPO likely – floating in Riyadh by the end of 2018 and delaying the planned international portion until 2019. Some chatter on the market even suggests that Aramco may scrap the international portion altogether, replacing with a private share sale to select world sovereign funds and institutional investors.

Last week in Asian oil

Upstream

  • Malaysia’s Petronas has outlined its plans for the Bukit Tua field in Indonesia. Phase one of Bukit Tua came on stream in May 2015; phase two is currently underway and Petronas wants to expand into a phase three that will exploit the field’s Kujung horizon. Expansions will continue through July 2022, lifting production from its current peak rate of 20 kb/d of oil and 50 mmscf/d of gas. Petronas holds 80% of the PSC, with the remainder held by Pertamina.

Downstream & Midstream

  • CNOOC’s 200 kb/d refinery in Huizhou is ready for commissioning. Crude trial runs have been completed at the site in Guangdong, which is part of CNOOC’s Huizhou refining and petrochemical complex that represents the firm’s move downstream to compete with Sinopec and PetroChina. The focus of the complex is for both fuels and chemicals, with a 1.2 mtpa ethylene plant (a joint venture with Shell) due to be completed in Q12018.
  • From a loose and scrappy group, China’s independent refiners – the teapots – are increasing becoming more structured and united, as they face increasing criticism from Sinopec and PetroChina. After forming a crude buying alliance last year, six influential teapots – including Dongming, the country’s largest independent refiner – set up the Shandong Refining & Chemical Group last month, and has now bolstered it with a CNY33 billion (US$5 billion) fund. The joint fund will go to joint production, operation and investment plans, as well as lobbying efforts, to support the group’s refining capacity of 660 kb/d.
  • Once dismissed as a pipe dream, the private Pulau Muara Besar refinery planned by Hengyi Petrochemical in Brunei actually appears to be progressing to reality. The Chinese group has started up a trading office in Singapore, which will buy crude and trade fuel products produced at the 175 kb/d, US$3.4 billion project. Primarily a petrochemical play to support Hengyi’s fabric and industrial arms, the refinery will also produce a significant amount of gasoline, gasoil and jet fuel, which Hengyi has no internal use for. The company has also announced a US$12 billion second phase that will include expanding capacity to 280 kb/d and secondary units to produce some 1.5 mtpa of ethylene and 2 mtpa of PX.

Natural Gas & LNG

  • Bangladesh is striving ahead in its LNG ambitions, signing up for a third floating LNG project with Malaysia’s Petronas and China’s Hong Kong Manjala Power. Planned to be located at Kutubdia in Cox’s Bazaar, the 3.5 mtpa import terminal is planned for a 2019 start, just in time to replace Bangladesh’s dwindling natural gas production. The country’s first FSRU – a 3.75 mtpa facility off Moheshkhali in the Bay of Bengal – is expected to start up in 2018.
  • CNPC has started up its third natural gas pipeline servicing Shanghai, aiming to meet the growing demand for clean power generation fuel in the city. The new 88km pipeline connects the Rudong LNG receiving terminal in Jiangshu with Shanghai’s Chongming island, with a capacity of some 1.84 billion cbm per year.

3
0 0

Something interesting to share?
Join NrgEdge and create your own NrgBuzz today

Latest NrgBuzz

Bioethanol Market to reach 68.95 Billion USD by 2022, Growing at a CAGR of 5.3%

The global bioethanol market is estimated at USD 53.19 Billion in 2017 and is projected to reach USD 68.95 Billion by 2022, at a CAGR of 5.3% from 2017 to 2022. The market is driven by the increased demand for bioethanol from various end-use industry segments, such as transportation, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, alcoholic beverages, and others. The transportation end-use industry segment led the global bioethanol market, in terms of volume, in 2016. 

Download PDF Brochure @ https://www.marketsandmarkets.com/pdfdownloadNew.asp?id=131222570

Major Growth Drivers: 
  • Government policies and mandates
    • Agricultural policies
    • Blending mandates
    • Subsidies and support
    • Tariffs & tax incentives
  • Volatile petroleum prices
  • Increase in awareness of climate change and green-house gas emission
  • Higher octane rating at a lower price than unleaded/pure gasoline

Starch-based feedstock is estimated to be the largest feedstock type in the global bioethanol market.

The starch-based segment is estimated to be the largest feedstock segment of the global bioethanol market. This feedstock type uses corn, barley, wheat, and other starch raw materials as feedstocks to produce bioethanol. Corn has the highest percentage of starch, about 70-72%. The growth in this segment is attributed to the rising demand from Asia Pacific and South America and the wide variety of feedstocks that can be used to produce starch-based bioethanol. The feedstocks used are available in almost all over the world.

bioethanol-market-131222570

Alcoholic beverages segment is estimated to be the fastest growing end-use industry segment of the global bioethanol market.

Among end-use industries, the alcoholic beverages segment is estimated to be the fastest growing end-use segment of the global bioethanol market. The growth of this segment is attributed to the increasing purchasing power in developing countries and the growing acceptance of drinking alcoholic beverages in some cultures.

North America contributes as the largest market of bioethanol

In 2016, North America accounted for largest share of the bioethanol market. Currently, the US is the largest market for bioethanol in North America, and is expected to continue to be the largest market till 2022. In the US, the demand for bioethanol is expected to increase due to the increasing government and environment regulations in the country. Regulations such as the Federal Reformulated Gasoline (RFG) and E15 regulations contribute to the growing use of bioethanol in fuels. The other driving factor for the bioethanol market is the low price of corn, which is a prime feedstock used in the production of bioethanol in the country. Many bioethanol manufacturers are based in this region.

Key companies profiled in the global bioethanol market research report include Archer Daniels Midland Company (US), POET LLC (US), Green Plains (US), Valero Energy Corporation (US), Flint Hills Resource (US), Abengoa Bioenergy SA (Spain), Royal Dutch Shell plc (Netherlands), Pacific Ethanol, Inc. (US), Petrobras (Brazil), and The Andersons (US).

Speak to Analyst @ https://www.marketsandmarkets.com/speaktoanalystNew.asp?id=131222570

About MarketsandMarkets™

MarketsandMarkets™ provides quantified B2B research on 30,000 high growth niche opportunities/threats which will impact 70% to 80% of worldwide companies’ revenues. Currently servicing 5000 customers worldwide including 80% of global Fortune 1000 companies as clients. Almost 75,000 top officers across eight industries worldwide approach MarketsandMarkets™ for their painpoints around revenues decisions.

Our 850 fulltime analyst and SMEs at MarketsandMarkets™ are tracking global high growth markets following the "Growth Engagement Model – GEM". The GEM aims at proactive collaboration with the clients to identify new opportunities, identify most important customers, write "Attack, avoid and defend" strategies, identify sources of incremental revenues for both the company and its competitors. MarketsandMarkets™ now coming up with 1,500 MicroQuadrants (Positioning top players across leaders, emerging companies, innovators, strategic players) annually in high growth emerging segments. MarketsandMarkets™ is determined to benefit more than 10,000 companies this year for their revenue planning and help them take their innovations/disruptions early to the market by providing them research ahead of the curve.

MarketsandMarkets’s flagship competitive intelligence and market research platform, "RT" connects over 200,000 markets and entire value chains for deeper understanding of the unmet insights along with market sizing and forecasts of niche markets.

Contact:
Mr. Shelly Singh
MarketsandMarkets™
701 Pike Street,
Suite 2175, Seattle,
WA 98101, United States
1-888-600-6441
Email: [email protected]

December, 11 2019
SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK
Forecast HighlightsGlobal liquid fuels
  • Brent crude oil spot prices averaged $63 per barrel (b) in November, up $3/b from October. EIA forecasts Brent spot prices will average $61/b in 2020, down from a 2019 average of $64/b. EIA forecasts that West Texas Intermediate (WTI) prices will average $5.50/b less than Brent prices in 2020. EIA expects crude oil prices will be lower on average in 2020 than in 2019 because of forecast rising global oil inventories, particularly in the first half of next year.
  • On December 6, the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and a group of other oil producers announced they were deepening production cuts originally announced in December 2018. The group is now targeting production that is 1.7 million barrels per day (b/d) lower than in October 2018, compared with the former target reduction of 1.2 million b/d. OPEC announced that the cuts would be in effect through the end of March 2020. However, EIA assumes that OPEC will limit production through all of 2020, amid a forecast of rising oil inventories. EIA forecasts OPEC crude oil production will average 29.3 million b/d in 2020, down by 0.5 million b/d from 2019.
  • Beginning on January 1, 2020, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) is set to enact Annex VI of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL Convention), which lowers the maximum sulfur content of marine fuel oil used in ocean-going vessels from 3.5% of weight to 0.5%. EIA expects that starting in the fourth quarter of 2019, this regulation will encourage global refiners to increase refinery runs and maximize upgrading of high-sulfur heavy fuel oil into low-sulfur distillate fuel to create compliant bunker fuels. EIA forecasts that U.S. refinery runs will rise by 3% from 2019 to a record level of 17.5 million b/d in 2020, resulting in refinery utilization rates that average 93% in 2020. EIA expects one of the most significant effects of the regulation to be on diesel wholesale margins, which rise from an average of 45 cents per gallon (gal) in 2019 to a forecasted peak of 61 cents/gal in the first quarter of 2020 and an average of 57 cents/gal in 2020.
  • EIA data show that the United States exported 90,000 b/d more total crude oil and petroleum products in September than it imported. This is the first month recorded in U.S. data that the United States exported more crude oil and petroleum products than it imported. U.S. imports and exports records of crude oil and petroleum products started on an annual basis in 1949 and on a monthly basis in 1973. EIA expects total crude oil and petroleum net exports to average 570,000 b/d in 2020 compared with average net imports of 490,000 b/d in 2019.
  • EIA expects U.S. crude oil production to average 13.2 million b/d in 2020, an increase of 0.9 million b/d from the 2019 level. Expected 2020 growth is slower than 2018 growth of 1.6 million b/d and 2019 growth of 1.3 million b/d. Slowing crude oil production growth results from a decline in drilling rigs over the past year that EIA expects to continue into 2020. Despite the decline in rigs, EIA forecasts production will continue to grow as rig efficiency and well-level productivity rises, offsetting the decline in the number of rigs.
  • EIA estimates that propane inventories in the Midwest—Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) 2—were 22.0 million barrels at the end of November, 17% lower than the five-year (2014–18) average for the end of November. Colder-than-normal temperatures and strong grain drying demand in November contributed to large draws on Midwest propane inventories. Also, Western Canadian rail shipments of propane to the Midwest have declined since the opening of a new propane export terminal in Western Canada in May. EIA forecasts Midwest inventories at the end of March will be 32% lower than the five-year (2015–19) average and the lowest for that time of year since 2014.

West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price

Natural gas
  • EIA estimates that the U.S. total working gas inventories were 3,616 billion cubic feet (Bcf) at the end of November. This level was about equal to the five-year (2014–18) average and 19% higher than a year ago. EIA expects storage withdrawals to total 1.9 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) from the end of October to the end of March, which is less than the five-year average winter withdrawal. A withdrawal of this amount would leave the end-of-March inventories at almost 1.9 Tcf, which would be 8% higher than the five-year (2015–19) average.
  • The U.S. benchmark Henry Hub natural gas spot price averaged $2.64 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) in November, up 31 cents/MMBtu from October. Prices increased as a result of November temperatures that were colder than the 10-year (2009–18) average. EIA forecasts the Henry Hub spot price to average $2.45/MMBtu in 2020, down 14 cents/MMBtu from the 2019 average.
  • EIA forecasts that annual U.S. dry natural gas production will average 92.1 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in 2019, up 10% from 2018. EIA expects that natural gas production will grow much less in 2020 because of the lag between changes in price and changes in future drilling activity. Low prices in the third quarter of 2019 will reduce natural gas-directed drilling in the first half of 2020. EIA forecasts natural gas production in 2020 will average 95.1 Bcf/d.

World liquid fuels production and consumption balance

Electricity, coal, renewables, and emissions
  • EIA expects the share of U.S. total utility-scale electricity generation from natural gas-fired power plants will rise from 34% in 2018 to 37% in 2019 and to 39% in 2020. EIA forecasts the share of U.S. electric generation from coal to average 25% in 2019 and 22% in 2020, down from 28% in 2018. EIA’s forecast nuclear share of U.S. generation remains at about 20% in 2019 and in 2020. Hydropower averages a 7% share of total U.S. generation in the forecast for 2019 and 2020, similar to 2018. Wind, solar, and other nonhydropower renewables provided 9% of U.S. total utility-scale generation in 2018. EIA expects they will provide 10% in 2019 and 12% in 2020.
  • EIA expects U.S. coal production in 2019 to total 697 million short tons (MMst), which would be an 8% decline from the 2018 level. In 2020, EIA expects a further decrease in total U.S. coal production of 14%, to an annual total of 601 MMst, reflecting continued idling and closures of mines as a result of declining domestic demand.
  • EIA expects U.S. coal exports to total 93 MMst in 2019, and then decline by 8 MMst to 85 MMst in 2020. U.S. coking coal currently faces challenges from a global oversupply of steel, particularly in the fourth quarter of 2019. Steam coal exports have been dampened by high stockpiles in Europe and India, a top destination for U.S. shipments.
  • EIA expects U.S. electric power sector generation from renewables other than hydropower—principally wind and solar—to grow from 411 billion kilowatthours (kWh) in 2019 to 471 billion kWh in 2020. In EIA’s forecast, Texas accounts for 20% of the U.S. nonhydropower renewables generation in 2019 and 22% in 2020. California’s forecast share of nonhydropower renewables generation falls from 15% in 2019 to 14% in 2020. EIA expects that the Midwest and Central power regions will see shares in the 16% to 18% range for 2019 and 2020.
  • EIA forecasts that, after rising by 2.9% in 2018, U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions will decline by 1.4% in 2019 and by 2.2% in 2020, partly as a result of lower forecast energy consumption. For 2019, EIA estimates there was less demand for space cooling because of cooler summer months, with an estimated 5% decline in U.S. cooling degree days from 2018, when temperatures were significantly higher than the previous 10-year (2008–17) average. In addition, EIA also expects U.S. CO2 emissions in 2019 to decline because the forecast share of electricity generated from natural gas and renewables will increase, and the share generated from coal, which is a more carbon-intensive energy source, will decrease.

U.S. natural gas prices

U.S. residential electricity price

December, 11 2019
INDONESIA’S DECOMMISSIONING CHALLENGE REPORT

A report by Nicholas Newman

Many of Indonesia’s oil and gas fields, both on and offshore, are coming to the end of their commercially viable operational lifespan. More than 60% of Indonesia’s oil and more than 30% of gas production comes from late-life-cycle resources spread across the world's largest island country. Despite investment and use of enhanced oil field recovery measures, as well as increasing automation to extend the economic lifespan of these assets, decommissioning will soon become necessary.

However Indonesia, like many countries new to the prospect of decommissioning energy infrastructure, face many key technological, fiscal, environmental, regulatory and industrial capacity issues, which need to be addressed by both government and industry decision makers.

This report, commissioned by the consulting and advisory arm of London and Aberdeen based Precision Media & Communications, aims to take a look at many of the issues Indonesia and other South East Asian oil producing nations are likely to face with the prospect of decommissioning the region's oil and gas aging energy infrastructure both onshore and offshore... To find out more Click here

December, 09 2019