Last Updated: October 31, 2017
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Press Release
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Middle East NOCs Identify Diversification as Priority for Stable
Long-Term Business Growth

 

Investment Strategies Aim to Maximise Revenue from Each Barrel of Oil

 

ADIPEC Will Support Vertical Integration Through Upstream, Midstream and Downstream Value Chain

 

Abu Dhabi, UAE – 8 October 2017 – An expanded and restructured strategic conference programme at the world’s leading annual meeting for senior oil and gas decision makers, the Abu Dhabi International Petroleum Exhibition and Conference (ADIPEC), will play a vital role in driving strategic investment decisions across the industry’s full value chain, organisers said today.

Investment in refining and selling the oil and gas industry’s end products, such as fuel, plastics, and petrochemicals, is emerging as a core business strategy among Middle East national oil companies (NOCs) wanting to capture more of the processed value of their natural resource.

ADIPEC’s 2017 strategic programme will be restructured to reflect this change. An expanded programme recognises the conference’s high-level participants – who include some of the world’s most powerful oil and gas CEOs – command businesses that cover the full scope of upstream, midstream, and downstream operations.

“ADIPEC’s guiding purpose is to be the convening power for the global industry, a platform where the industry’s leading CEOs define and refine their strategic direction,” said Ali Khalifa Al Shamsi, Al Yasat CEO and ADIPEC 2017 Chairman. “Although exploration, production and export of crude oil remain the foundation of the region’s NOCs, today’s business models increasingly look beyond this, making downstream investments that accumulate benefits through each value-added process. ADIPEC is committed to acting as a driving force in support of this evolution.”

ADIPEC’s strategic conference programme will include several ministerial sessions and four global business leader sessions, offering panel discussions and interviews with some of the senior government and industry decision makers who are shaping the future of oil and gas. An additional four downstream global business leader sessions will focus exclusively on value-added processes. Specialised sessions within the conference programme will offer knowledge exchange in areas such as security, the offshore and marine sector, and the role of women in the energy industry. For C-level delegates, there will be 10 C-suite dialogues, offering highly exclusive, interactive panel discussions of critical business issues. As well as the strategic conference, ADIPEC offers oil and gas professionals 119 technical sessions catering to all aspects of the industry.

The conference programme sits alongside a world-class commercial exhibition and offers unrivalled one-to-one business networking opportunities, confirming ADIPEC as a deal-making hub where the industry’s most influential decision makers find connections and forge partnerships that will drive future growth.

As a platform for discussing the industry’s most important issues, ADIPEC consistently adapts to meet leadership concerns. From a strong focus on exploration and production during the pre-2014 period of sustained high oil prices, 2015 and 2016 have emphasised innovation and improved efficiency to reduce immediate costs. The latest changes recognise an industry adapting to a new normal. This sees investment returning to exploration and production in anticipation of rising demand, growing interest in natural gas, and a long-term imperative to add value to the resource.

As part of its integrated 2030 Strategy, the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC), which hosts ADIPEC, is creating more profitable downstream and more valuable upstream businesses. The strategy will increase production capacity to 3.5 million barrels of oil per day by 2018; increase gasoline production to 10.2 million tonnes per annum by 2022, and grow petrochemicals production from 4.5 million tonnes in 2016 to 11.4 million tonnes by 2025. It will also diversify its range of high-value innovative plastics solutions. Similar goals are being set by NOCs across the Middle East and beyond.

The emerging business approach seeks to maximise the value of each barrel that NOCs produce, by generating additional revenue from each layer of processing, distribution and sales.  As well as generating more revenue, investments along the value chain can smooth out the impact of fluctuations in oil and gas prices, as rising or falling markets affect each layer of the industry differently.

According to analysis by the Boston Consulting Group, low prices for crude oil will often reduce profits for exploration and production, but at the same time will increase profits downstream as inputs become cheaper and buyer demand rises. When the oil price dropped sharply during 2014, margins at major European and Asian refining hubs went up, rising by around 72 per cent in Rotterdam and 57 per cent in Singapore. High prices for crude shift the balance in the opposite direction.

“With our strategic conference programme for 2017, ADIPEC breaks down the division between upstream and midstream sectors, extracting and transporting the natural resource, and downstream value-adding and manufacturing of products for the end customer,” said Christopher Hudson, President – dmg events, Global Energy, which organises ADIPEC.

“All these elements are one industry, and many of the CEOs who will convene at ADIPEC have a growing portfolio of responsibilities for every layer of a global, vertically integrated business. To fulfil our mission as the convening power for the global oil and gas industry, we must enable dialogue and insight across the full scope of their responsibilities and concerns.”

Confirmed speakers for the ADIPEC conference include H. E. Mohammed Barkindo, Secretary General of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), and H.E. Suhail Mohamed Mazrouei, Minister of Energy of the United Arab Emirates, as well as government ministers from Egypt, Oman, Bahrain, Lebanon, Nigeria and Mexico. They will be joined by CEOs from major NOCs, international oil companies (IOCs) and leading oilfield services firms, as well as top industry experts.

Conference sessions and panel discussions include broad-ranging knowledge exchange on achieving stable and sustainable long-term growth for the industry, including through collaboration and partnerships, innovation and efficiency of operations, enabling smart growth across the value chain, and driving investment into downstream refining and petrochemicals. Change and industry disruption will be important topics, looking at how the petroleum industry can adapt to the changing roles of oil and natural gas in a low-carbon future.

Held under the patronage of His Highness Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, President of the UAE, hosted by the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC), and organised by the Global Energy division of dmg events, ADIPEC is one of the world’s leading oil and gas events, and the largest in Africa and the Middle East.

ADIPEC will be held at Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre from 13 to 16 November 2017.


- ENDS –

About ADIPEC

Held under the patronage of the President of the United Arab Emirates, His Highness Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, and organised by the Global Energy division of dmg events, ADIPEC is the global meeting point for oil and gas professionals. Standing as one of the world’s top energy events, and the largest in the Middle East and North Africa, ADIPEC is a knowledge-sharing platform that enables industry experts to exchange ideas and information that shape the future of the energy sector. The 19th edition of ADIPEC 2016 took place from 7-10 November at the Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre (ADNEC). ADIPEC 2016 was supported by the UAE Ministry of Energy, Masdar, the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC), the Abu Dhabi Chamber, and the Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi). dmg Global Energy is committed to helping the growing international energy community bridge gaps by bringing oil and gas professionals face to face with new technologies and business opportunities.


For media enquiries, please contact:

Nour Soliman

Senior Marketing Manager, DMG Events Global Energy

Twofour54, Park Rotana Offices, 6th Floor

PO Box 769256, Abu Dhabi, UAE

T: +971 (0)2 6970 515


Wallis 

[email protected]

T: +971 4 275 4100

Mark Robinson (English):  +971 (0)55 127 9764

Feras Hamzah (Arabic):     +971 (0)50 798 4784


For more info: http://www.adipec.com/

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The United States consumed a record amount of renewable energy in 2019

In 2019, consumption of renewable energy in the United States grew for the fourth year in a row, reaching a record 11.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu), or 11% of total U.S. energy consumption. The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) new U.S. renewable energy consumption by source and sector chart published in the Monthly Energy Review shows how much renewable energy by source is consumed in each sector.

In its Monthly Energy Review, EIA converts sources of energy to common units of heat, called British thermal units (Btu), to compare different types of energy that are more commonly measured in units that are not directly comparable, such as gallons of biofuels compared with kilowatthours of wind energy. EIA uses a fossil fuel equivalence to calculate primary energy consumption of noncombustible renewables such as wind, hydro, solar, and geothermal.

U.S. renewable energy consumption by sector

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review

Wind energy in the United States is almost exclusively used by wind-powered turbines to generate electricity in the electric power sector, and it accounted for about 24% of U.S. renewable energy consumption in 2019. Wind surpassed hydroelectricity to become the most-consumed source of renewable energy on an annual basis in 2019.

Wood and waste energy, including wood, wood pellets, and biomass waste from landfills, accounted for about 24% of U.S. renewable energy use in 2019. Industrial, commercial, and electric power facilities use wood and waste as fuel to generate electricity, to produce heat, and to manufacture goods. About 2% of U.S. households used wood as their primary source of heat in 2019.

Hydroelectric power is almost exclusively used by water-powered turbines to generate electricity in the electric power sector and accounted for about 22% of U.S. renewable energy consumption in 2019. U.S. hydropower consumption has remained relatively consistent since the 1960s, but it fluctuates with seasonal rainfall and drought conditions.

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operating natural-gas fired electric generating capacity by online year

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Electric Generator Inventory

Based on the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) annual survey of electric generators, natural gas-fired generators accounted for 43% of operating U.S. electricity generating capacity in 2019. These natural gas-fired generators provided 39% of electricity generation in 2019, more than any other source. Most of the natural gas-fired capacity added in recent decades uses combined-cycle technology, which surpassed coal-fired generators in 2018 to become the technology with the most electricity generating capacity in the United States.

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natural gas-fired electric gnerating capacity by retirement year

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Electric Generator Inventory

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operating natural gas-fired electric generating capacity in selected states

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Electric Generator Inventory

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global energy consumption for power generation

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, International Energy Outlook 2020 (IEO2020)

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IEO2020 builds on the Reference case presented in IEO2019. The models, economic assumptions, and input oil prices from the IEO2019 Reference case largely remained unchanged, but EIA adjusted specific elements or assumptions to explore areas of uncertainty such as the rapid growth of renewable energy.

Because IEO2020 is based on the IEO2019 modeling platform and because it focuses on long-term electricity market dynamics, it does not include the impacts of COVID-19 and related mitigation efforts. The Annual Energy Outlook 2021 (AEO2021) and IEO2021 will both feature analyses of the impact of COVID-19 mitigation efforts on energy markets.

Asia infographic, as described in the article text


Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, International Energy Outlook 2020 (IEO2020)
Note: Click to enlarge.

With the IEO2020 release, EIA is publishing new Plain Language documentation of EIA’s World Energy Projection System (WEPS), the modeling system that EIA uses to produce IEO projections. EIA’s new Handbook of Energy Modeling Methods includes sections on most WEPS components, and EIA will release more sections in the coming months.

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