NrgEdge Editor

Sharing content and articles for users
Last Updated: November 15, 2017
1 view
Business Trends
image

A practicing Professional Engineer and DOSH qualified 1st Grade Steam Engineer, Ir Mahmood Azmy holds the position of CEO at MECIP Global Engineers Sdn Bhd, and is an active member of IEM, MOGEC and MOGSC, and serves as a board member of SEAMOG Group Sdn Bhd.


uploads1510709899678-IMG_0016b.jpg

Ir Mahmood Azmy Muhd Shukri, MECIP CEO


  1. What has been your greatest achievement so far in MECIP?
    I have been with MECIP for a while now. The greatest achievement for MECIP is that we are able to establish ourselves strongly as equivalent to other international players in oil and gas business. Being local and positioned in Kerteh, Terengganu, it is quite difficult to be visible. But we manage to step out of our boundaries in becoming more prominent in the oil and gas community. It is an achievement for us in terms of the company’s branding, which helps us in marketing, gaining trust and becoming business partners of PETRONAS, Shell, other reputable oil and gas companies, as well as working closely with MATRADE to market our services overseas. This is in line with our company name – MECIP Global, where we want to position ourselves globally as an oil and gas engineering services provider.

  2. I understand that you previously worked in PETRONAS. And now as CEO of MECIP, do you think that the business connections you made back then has helped you in your business?
    I worked with PETRONAS for more than 12 years in oil refinery and petrochemical plant, and another 10 years in a US-based company, HUNTSMAN which gave me very good technical background in oil, gas, and petrochemical business. Being in PETRONAS for many years, coupled with international exposure with HUNTSMAN, I made quite a number of connections which enriched my technical and management experience. I started my career as a project engineer in Kerteh Refinery Reformer Project, then subsequently lead maintenance team in Kerteh Refinery and the Inspection team in Kerteh Ethylene Polyethylene plant. I made my career move outside of PETRONAS to lead Engineering team in HUNTSMAN to gain further knowledge, experience and exposure working with an international company. In managing projects, maintenance, inspection and engineering work, many technical matters were covered, and I had the opportunity to work with specialists and experts in various subject matters. It was expected of me to ensure all activities managed must be well planned, conducted in high safety standards, with great attention to detail, with target of zero defect and according to schedule. I was able understand the technical part of the business and management of engineering work much better through these experiences and business connections locally and overseas. All these experiences, knowledge, contact and business relationships, are very important for me and MECIP to deliver quality engineering service to our clients.

  3.  Are there challenges you faced over the years that you have overcome? How did you do so?
    Working in oil and gas means you may face multiple challenges over the years. One of the challenges we faced is related to people. We must hire good, competent, talented and well-committed people. Because they will become our assets. Getting the right people is a real challenge. For example, when you’re building a house, the foundation must be strong. Even if the house looks beautiful on the outside, if it doesn’t have a good foundation, it will crumble when a storm comes. That’s why it’s important to get the right people, with the right attitude and mindset. We’re looking for people who want to grow with the company. I would like to groom or nurture them to be like me! I want to develop them into becoming future leaders of our business. But sometimes it’s difficult to retain good talent, as they might resign as soon as there’s a better position somewhere else, and then we have to start the hiring process all over again. That’s why we introduced a loyalty programme for our staff. Those who stay for more than 5 years in our company, we reward them with vacation trips, and the longer they stay, the better the rewards. On top of this, we also have annual dinners to encourage a community-feel in our company. We do these little things because we want our people to be happy, enjoy working and stay loyal with MECIP.

  4. Has there been a new development in MECIP, perhaps a new way of doing things or a new technology, that has recently helped a project?
    Technology has been developing so rapidly worldwide, and we have to adjust ourselves. In terms of engineering software, it has changed the way we do things. In design work, we have evolved from using manual tools to computer software and programmes. It is an expensive investment, but we must do it in order to adapt and grow our business. We are always looking for ways to improve our work processes and efficiency. With technology, it will really help us to improve our work performance to serve our client better and this is in line with our passion to serve - “Do it right the first time, every time.”

  5.  As I understand it, it is MECIP’s vision to provide local solutions with global expertise. Do you believe that the local talents are at par with overseas counterparts? 
    Overseas talents are more exposed to the global market and they might have more expertise and experience compared to Malaysian talents. Our local talents, normally having minimal overseas experience, will have limited opportunities to work overseas as they might not be familiar with the countries’ code and standards. I do believe that we have to expose ourselves more to overseas market, learn new standards and explore better ways of doing things. In terms of the local market opportunities, especially for various big local projects here in Malaysia, I do believe the local workforce are capable and competent enough to take bigger roles and responsibilities. In fact, I think we can even speed up to build our local strength if there is a policy that requires foreign players to work under local companies for mega projects in Malaysia. I strongly urge government policy to address this matter accordingly to ensure better development and growth of Malaysian local companies. “Malaysia Boleh” slogan should continue to roar.

  6. What can students or fresh graduates do to prepare themselves for a career in the oil and gas industry? 
    In general, this message is not just for students but also to young fresh graduates who are embarking their careers in oil and gas - you must prepare yourselves mentally in terms of technical know-how and communication. You must apply good analytical thinking and ask questions to enhance understanding. If you don’t ask, how will you learn? You may think it’s alright to just let things go and leave it up to your bosses to correct your work. This is not the right thinking process. You need to put in extra efforts to learn, even after office hours or during your free time on weekends. The learning curve for young graduates must be exponential and they must strive to be good in their respective technical knowledge, especially if they are engineers. If you come across something that you want to delve deeper at work, keep that as ‘homework’. Keep an inventory of things you want to learn in your pocket. I call this the ‘pocket list’. So, you will always occupy yourself with learning. Be proactive in whatever tasks and initiatives given to you. For engineers, I would encourage you to get additional certifications because a degree on its own may not be enough. Work hard towards becoming a Professional Engineer as the career objective. Join professional societies and become a member of Institute of Engineer Malaysia (IEM), Institute of Materials, Malaysia (IMM), etc. These will help you gain good connections and learn about new technologies in the industry.

  7. Having worked with various business partners all over the world, was there something from overseas that impressed you, that you have successfully adapted at MECIP?
    Working with a Japanese company like Chiyoda Corporation, was a very good experience. Being in Japan, you get to observe how Japanese people manage their time. They are very focused and the quality of work produced is extremely good. They are also very detail-oriented, even their handwriting is very neat. I enjoyed very much working with the Japanese and try to adopt similar mindset at MECIP – being result-oriented, attention to detail, work hard, and take things seriously. Sometimes you might have to stay back and work, but that’s what you have to do in order to achieve results. We will not allow substandard work to be produced. We also established a good quality culture in our office - we developed an engineering design process called interdisciplinary checks (IDC) where there are multiple checks to ensure our engineers produce quality work. And this is part of the ISO 9000 quality management system, which is basically derived from the Japanese culture. Our company is an ISO 9001-certified company, and we believe in delivering a good quality job, in a safe and timely manner. We also believe in continuous improvement or “Kaizen” – engineers must develop themselves in order to become senior engineers and so on. You can’t stay in one position forever. Punctuality is also one of the things I try to emphasize. The Japanese are very punctual with their timing. Most importantly, I value honesty at work. Japanese people are very transparent with their work – if they made a mistake, they will own up to it. For locals, saying sorry might be more difficult. But it’s important to keep that integrity.

  8. What is the company culture of MECIP?
    As I mentioned, we like to encourage continuous improvement in our company. We also encourage our engineers to practice their communications skills. For example, we have “English Day” in the office where staff will practice their presentation skills in English. Some might have broken English, but the important thing is they try and keep on improving themselves. We give awards to the “Best Speakers” in our annual dinners. We also like to reward those who give internal training and share their knowledge with others. Usually the juniors will nominate their seniors who they think are the best “coach” or “teacher”. We actually have a few excellent engineers who like to share their technical knowledge. In general, we want to improve through excellence in knowledge and we encourage everyone to learn from each other. We want our engineers to be passionate about their own expertise and share this passion with others.

  9. What is next in the pipeline for MECIP?
    We are planning to secure some overseas projects. We have been to Brunei, Jakarta, Aberdeen, Houston. We’ll be going to Abu Dhabi in Middle East in mid-November. We have our partners in Abu Dhabi and the next step is to secure overseas jobs that can be done locally in Malaysia. In recent years, we have established a good partnership with a Norwegian company, Sharecat, and have formed a Malaysian joint-venture (JV) company with them to provides oil and gas services to the European market. In our plan, Norway will be like a big “storage tank”, and they will pipe down the work to us in Malaysia to execute. Due to the economic downturn, the market is a little slow. But we hope business will pick up soon once the market recovers. We are looking for more channels like these so we can hire more local engineers and nurture them to become future leaders. Our goal is to encourage more participation and involvement of our local engineers to serve the global market through MECIP. MECIP also seriously plans to expand and venture into new horizons through SEAMOG, a new company that was formed to do EPCC packages and major plant Turnaround. We believe in consolidation and having equal shares with other three strong companies in SEAMOG will make us grow bigger and faster. We want to transform MECIP for a better future.

  10. Finally, name things that are important to you – in life or in your career.
    Always have in mind, to do the right thing. Be thankful and grateful. Be honest, trust and grow people. Don’t get easily frustrated when things don’t go your way. When you do something, there should be no turning back. You must have a goal and know which direction you are heading. Have good and sincere intentions because it will most definitely be rewarded in the end.


    Sign up on NrgEdge to read more articles like these and get connected with oil, gas and energy industry influencers!
    Visit https://goo.gl/a36LfT

Nrgtalk influencer interview oil and gas energy business
3
10 2

Something interesting to share?
Join NrgEdge and create your own NrgBuzz today

Latest NrgBuzz

The United States consumed a record amount of renewable energy in 2019

In 2019, consumption of renewable energy in the United States grew for the fourth year in a row, reaching a record 11.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu), or 11% of total U.S. energy consumption. The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) new U.S. renewable energy consumption by source and sector chart published in the Monthly Energy Review shows how much renewable energy by source is consumed in each sector.

In its Monthly Energy Review, EIA converts sources of energy to common units of heat, called British thermal units (Btu), to compare different types of energy that are more commonly measured in units that are not directly comparable, such as gallons of biofuels compared with kilowatthours of wind energy. EIA uses a fossil fuel equivalence to calculate primary energy consumption of noncombustible renewables such as wind, hydro, solar, and geothermal.

U.S. renewable energy consumption by sector

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review

Wind energy in the United States is almost exclusively used by wind-powered turbines to generate electricity in the electric power sector, and it accounted for about 24% of U.S. renewable energy consumption in 2019. Wind surpassed hydroelectricity to become the most-consumed source of renewable energy on an annual basis in 2019.

Wood and waste energy, including wood, wood pellets, and biomass waste from landfills, accounted for about 24% of U.S. renewable energy use in 2019. Industrial, commercial, and electric power facilities use wood and waste as fuel to generate electricity, to produce heat, and to manufacture goods. About 2% of U.S. households used wood as their primary source of heat in 2019.

Hydroelectric power is almost exclusively used by water-powered turbines to generate electricity in the electric power sector and accounted for about 22% of U.S. renewable energy consumption in 2019. U.S. hydropower consumption has remained relatively consistent since the 1960s, but it fluctuates with seasonal rainfall and drought conditions.

Biofuels, including fuel ethanol, biodiesel, and other renewable fuels, accounted for about 20% of U.S. renewable energy consumption in 2019. Biofuels usually are blended with petroleum-based motor gasoline and diesel and are consumed as liquid fuels in automobiles. Industrial consumption of biofuels accounts for about 36% of U.S. biofuel energy consumption.

Solar energy, consumed to generate electricity or directly as heat, accounted for about 9% of U.S. renewable energy consumption in 2019 and had the largest percentage growth among renewable sources in 2019. Solar photovoltaic (PV) cells, including rooftop panels, and solar thermal power plants use sunlight to generate electricity. Some residential and commercial buildings heat with solar heating systems.

October, 20 2020
Natural gas generators make up largest share of U.S. electricity generation capacity

operating natural-gas fired electric generating capacity by online year

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Electric Generator Inventory

Based on the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) annual survey of electric generators, natural gas-fired generators accounted for 43% of operating U.S. electricity generating capacity in 2019. These natural gas-fired generators provided 39% of electricity generation in 2019, more than any other source. Most of the natural gas-fired capacity added in recent decades uses combined-cycle technology, which surpassed coal-fired generators in 2018 to become the technology with the most electricity generating capacity in the United States.

Technological improvements have led to improved efficiency of natural gas generators since the mid-1980s, when combined-cycle plants began replacing older, less efficient steam turbines. For steam turbines, boilers combust fuel to generate steam that drives a turbine to generate electricity. Combustion turbines use a fuel-air mixture to spin a gas turbine. Combined-cycle units, as their name implies, combine these technologies: a fuel-air mixture spins gas turbines to generate electricity, and the excess heat from the gas turbine is used to generate steam for a steam turbine that generates additional electricity.

Combined-cycle generators generally operate for extended periods; combustion turbines and steam turbines are typically only used at times of peak load. Relatively few steam turbines have been installed since the late 1970s, and many steam turbines have been retired in recent years.

natural gas-fired electric gnerating capacity by retirement year

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Electric Generator Inventory

Not only are combined-cycle systems more efficient than steam or combustion turbines alone, the combined-cycle systems installed more recently are more efficient than the combined-cycle units installed more than a decade ago. These changes in efficiency have reduced the amount of natural gas needed to produce the same amount of electricity. Combined-cycle generators consume 80% of the natural gas used to generate electric power but provide 85% of total natural gas-fired electricity.

operating natural gas-fired electric generating capacity in selected states

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Electric Generator Inventory

Every U.S. state, except Vermont and Hawaii, has at least one utility-scale natural gas electric power plant. Texas, Florida, and California—the three states with the most electricity consumption in 2019—each have more than 35 gigawatts of natural gas-fired capacity. In many states, the majority of this capacity is combined-cycle technology, but 44% of New York’s natural gas capacity is steam turbines and 67% of Illinois’s natural gas capacity is combustion turbines.

October, 19 2020
EIA’s International Energy Outlook analyzes electricity markets in India, Africa, and Asia

Countries that are not members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Asia, including China and India, and in Africa are home to more than two-thirds of the world population. These regions accounted for 44% of primary energy consumed by the electric sector in 2019, and the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) projected they will reach 56% by 2050 in the Reference case in the International Energy Outlook 2019 (IEO2019). Changes in these economies significantly affect global energy markets.

Today, EIA is releasing its International Energy Outlook 2020 (IEO2020), which analyzes generating technology, fuel price, and infrastructure uncertainty in the electricity markets of Africa, Asia, and India. A related webcast presentation will begin this morning at 9:00 a.m. Eastern Time from the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

global energy consumption for power generation

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, International Energy Outlook 2020 (IEO2020)

IEO2020 focuses on the electricity sector, which consumes a growing share of the world’s primary energy. The makeup of the electricity sector is changing rapidly. The use of cost-efficient wind and solar technologies is increasing, and, in many regions of the world, use of lower-cost liquefied natural gas is also increasing. In IEO2019, EIA projected renewables to rise from about 20% of total energy consumed for electricity generation in 2010 to the largest single energy source by 2050.

The following are some key findings of IEO2020:

  • As energy use grows in Asia, some cases indicate more than 50% of electricity could be generated from renewables by 2050.
    IEO2020 features cases that consider differing natural gas prices and renewable energy capital costs in Asia, showing how these costs could shift the fuel mix for generating electricity in the region either further toward fossil fuels or toward renewables.
  • Africa could meet its electricity growth needs in different ways depending on whether development comes as an expansion of the central grid or as off-grid systems.
    Falling costs for solar photovoltaic installations and increased use of off-grid distribution systems have opened up technology options for the development of electricity infrastructure in Africa. Africa’s power generation mix could shift away from current coal-fired and natural gas-fired technologies used in the existing central grid toward off-grid resources, including extensive use of non-hydroelectric renewable generation sources.
  • Transmission infrastructure affects options available to change the future fuel mix for electricity generation in India.
    IEO2020 cases demonstrate the ways that electricity grid interconnections influence fuel choices for electricity generation in India. In cases where India relies more on a unified grid that can transmit electricity across regions, the share of renewables significantly increases and the share of coal decreases between 2019 and 2050. More limited movement of electricity favors existing in-region generation, which is mostly fossil fuels.

IEO2020 builds on the Reference case presented in IEO2019. The models, economic assumptions, and input oil prices from the IEO2019 Reference case largely remained unchanged, but EIA adjusted specific elements or assumptions to explore areas of uncertainty such as the rapid growth of renewable energy.

Because IEO2020 is based on the IEO2019 modeling platform and because it focuses on long-term electricity market dynamics, it does not include the impacts of COVID-19 and related mitigation efforts. The Annual Energy Outlook 2021 (AEO2021) and IEO2021 will both feature analyses of the impact of COVID-19 mitigation efforts on energy markets.

Asia infographic, as described in the article text


Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, International Energy Outlook 2020 (IEO2020)
Note: Click to enlarge.

With the IEO2020 release, EIA is publishing new Plain Language documentation of EIA’s World Energy Projection System (WEPS), the modeling system that EIA uses to produce IEO projections. EIA’s new Handbook of Energy Modeling Methods includes sections on most WEPS components, and EIA will release more sections in the coming months.

October, 16 2020