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A practicing Professional Engineer and DOSH qualified 1st Grade Steam Engineer, Ir Mahmood Azmy holds the position of CEO at MECIP Global Engineers Sdn Bhd, and is an active member of IEM, MOGEC and MOGSC, and serves as a board member of SEAMOG Group Sdn Bhd.


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Ir Mahmood Azmy Muhd Shukri, MECIP CEO


  1. What has been your greatest achievement so far in MECIP?
    I have been with MECIP for a while now. The greatest achievement for MECIP is that we are able to establish ourselves strongly as equivalent to other international players in oil and gas business. Being local and positioned in Kerteh, Terengganu, it is quite difficult to be visible. But we manage to step out of our boundaries in becoming more prominent in the oil and gas community. It is an achievement for us in terms of the company’s branding, which helps us in marketing, gaining trust and becoming business partners of PETRONAS, Shell, other reputable oil and gas companies, as well as working closely with MATRADE to market our services overseas. This is in line with our company name – MECIP Global, where we want to position ourselves globally as an oil and gas engineering services provider.

  2. I understand that you previously worked in PETRONAS. And now as CEO of MECIP, do you think that the business connections you made back then has helped you in your business?
    I worked with PETRONAS for more than 12 years in oil refinery and petrochemical plant, and another 10 years in a US-based company, HUNTSMAN which gave me very good technical background in oil, gas, and petrochemical business. Being in PETRONAS for many years, coupled with international exposure with HUNTSMAN, I made quite a number of connections which enriched my technical and management experience. I started my career as a project engineer in Kerteh Refinery Reformer Project, then subsequently lead maintenance team in Kerteh Refinery and the Inspection team in Kerteh Ethylene Polyethylene plant. I made my career move outside of PETRONAS to lead Engineering team in HUNTSMAN to gain further knowledge, experience and exposure working with an international company. In managing projects, maintenance, inspection and engineering work, many technical matters were covered, and I had the opportunity to work with specialists and experts in various subject matters. It was expected of me to ensure all activities managed must be well planned, conducted in high safety standards, with great attention to detail, with target of zero defect and according to schedule. I was able understand the technical part of the business and management of engineering work much better through these experiences and business connections locally and overseas. All these experiences, knowledge, contact and business relationships, are very important for me and MECIP to deliver quality engineering service to our clients.

  3.  Are there challenges you faced over the years that you have overcome? How did you do so?
    Working in oil and gas means you may face multiple challenges over the years. One of the challenges we faced is related to people. We must hire good, competent, talented and well-committed people. Because they will become our assets. Getting the right people is a real challenge. For example, when you’re building a house, the foundation must be strong. Even if the house looks beautiful on the outside, if it doesn’t have a good foundation, it will crumble when a storm comes. That’s why it’s important to get the right people, with the right attitude and mindset. We’re looking for people who want to grow with the company. I would like to groom or nurture them to be like me! I want to develop them into becoming future leaders of our business. But sometimes it’s difficult to retain good talent, as they might resign as soon as there’s a better position somewhere else, and then we have to start the hiring process all over again. That’s why we introduced a loyalty programme for our staff. Those who stay for more than 5 years in our company, we reward them with vacation trips, and the longer they stay, the better the rewards. On top of this, we also have annual dinners to encourage a community-feel in our company. We do these little things because we want our people to be happy, enjoy working and stay loyal with MECIP.

  4. Has there been a new development in MECIP, perhaps a new way of doing things or a new technology, that has recently helped a project?
    Technology has been developing so rapidly worldwide, and we have to adjust ourselves. In terms of engineering software, it has changed the way we do things. In design work, we have evolved from using manual tools to computer software and programmes. It is an expensive investment, but we must do it in order to adapt and grow our business. We are always looking for ways to improve our work processes and efficiency. With technology, it will really help us to improve our work performance to serve our client better and this is in line with our passion to serve - “Do it right the first time, every time.”

  5.  As I understand it, it is MECIP’s vision to provide local solutions with global expertise. Do you believe that the local talents are at par with overseas counterparts? 
    Overseas talents are more exposed to the global market and they might have more expertise and experience compared to Malaysian talents. Our local talents, normally having minimal overseas experience, will have limited opportunities to work overseas as they might not be familiar with the countries’ code and standards. I do believe that we have to expose ourselves more to overseas market, learn new standards and explore better ways of doing things. In terms of the local market opportunities, especially for various big local projects here in Malaysia, I do believe the local workforce are capable and competent enough to take bigger roles and responsibilities. In fact, I think we can even speed up to build our local strength if there is a policy that requires foreign players to work under local companies for mega projects in Malaysia. I strongly urge government policy to address this matter accordingly to ensure better development and growth of Malaysian local companies. “Malaysia Boleh” slogan should continue to roar.

  6. What can students or fresh graduates do to prepare themselves for a career in the oil and gas industry? 
    In general, this message is not just for students but also to young fresh graduates who are embarking their careers in oil and gas - you must prepare yourselves mentally in terms of technical know-how and communication. You must apply good analytical thinking and ask questions to enhance understanding. If you don’t ask, how will you learn? You may think it’s alright to just let things go and leave it up to your bosses to correct your work. This is not the right thinking process. You need to put in extra efforts to learn, even after office hours or during your free time on weekends. The learning curve for young graduates must be exponential and they must strive to be good in their respective technical knowledge, especially if they are engineers. If you come across something that you want to delve deeper at work, keep that as ‘homework’. Keep an inventory of things you want to learn in your pocket. I call this the ‘pocket list’. So, you will always occupy yourself with learning. Be proactive in whatever tasks and initiatives given to you. For engineers, I would encourage you to get additional certifications because a degree on its own may not be enough. Work hard towards becoming a Professional Engineer as the career objective. Join professional societies and become a member of Institute of Engineer Malaysia (IEM), Institute of Materials, Malaysia (IMM), etc. These will help you gain good connections and learn about new technologies in the industry.

  7. Having worked with various business partners all over the world, was there something from overseas that impressed you, that you have successfully adapted at MECIP?
    Working with a Japanese company like Chiyoda Corporation, was a very good experience. Being in Japan, you get to observe how Japanese people manage their time. They are very focused and the quality of work produced is extremely good. They are also very detail-oriented, even their handwriting is very neat. I enjoyed very much working with the Japanese and try to adopt similar mindset at MECIP – being result-oriented, attention to detail, work hard, and take things seriously. Sometimes you might have to stay back and work, but that’s what you have to do in order to achieve results. We will not allow substandard work to be produced. We also established a good quality culture in our office - we developed an engineering design process called interdisciplinary checks (IDC) where there are multiple checks to ensure our engineers produce quality work. And this is part of the ISO 9000 quality management system, which is basically derived from the Japanese culture. Our company is an ISO 9001-certified company, and we believe in delivering a good quality job, in a safe and timely manner. We also believe in continuous improvement or “Kaizen” – engineers must develop themselves in order to become senior engineers and so on. You can’t stay in one position forever. Punctuality is also one of the things I try to emphasize. The Japanese are very punctual with their timing. Most importantly, I value honesty at work. Japanese people are very transparent with their work – if they made a mistake, they will own up to it. For locals, saying sorry might be more difficult. But it’s important to keep that integrity.

  8. What is the company culture of MECIP?
    As I mentioned, we like to encourage continuous improvement in our company. We also encourage our engineers to practice their communications skills. For example, we have “English Day” in the office where staff will practice their presentation skills in English. Some might have broken English, but the important thing is they try and keep on improving themselves. We give awards to the “Best Speakers” in our annual dinners. We also like to reward those who give internal training and share their knowledge with others. Usually the juniors will nominate their seniors who they think are the best “coach” or “teacher”. We actually have a few excellent engineers who like to share their technical knowledge. In general, we want to improve through excellence in knowledge and we encourage everyone to learn from each other. We want our engineers to be passionate about their own expertise and share this passion with others.

  9. What is next in the pipeline for MECIP?
    We are planning to secure some overseas projects. We have been to Brunei, Jakarta, Aberdeen, Houston. We’ll be going to Abu Dhabi in Middle East in mid-November. We have our partners in Abu Dhabi and the next step is to secure overseas jobs that can be done locally in Malaysia. In recent years, we have established a good partnership with a Norwegian company, Sharecat, and have formed a Malaysian joint-venture (JV) company with them to provides oil and gas services to the European market. In our plan, Norway will be like a big “storage tank”, and they will pipe down the work to us in Malaysia to execute. Due to the economic downturn, the market is a little slow. But we hope business will pick up soon once the market recovers. We are looking for more channels like these so we can hire more local engineers and nurture them to become future leaders. Our goal is to encourage more participation and involvement of our local engineers to serve the global market through MECIP. MECIP also seriously plans to expand and venture into new horizons through SEAMOG, a new company that was formed to do EPCC packages and major plant Turnaround. We believe in consolidation and having equal shares with other three strong companies in SEAMOG will make us grow bigger and faster. We want to transform MECIP for a better future.

  10. Finally, name things that are important to you – in life or in your career.
    Always have in mind, to do the right thing. Be thankful and grateful. Be honest, trust and grow people. Don’t get easily frustrated when things don’t go your way. When you do something, there should be no turning back. You must have a goal and know which direction you are heading. Have good and sincere intentions because it will most definitely be rewarded in the end.


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Leveraging Synergies Created by the Convergence of Operational and Engineering Technologies and Digitalisation, Can Deliver Significant Savings for Energy Companies

Pioneering technology expert tells ADIPEC Energy Dialogue up to 80 per cent of plant shutdowns could be mitigated through combination of advanced electrification, automation and digitalisation technologies

 

Greater use of renewables in power management processes offers oil and gas companies opportunities to create efficiencies, sustainability and affordability when modernising equipment, or planning new CAPEX projects


Abu Dhabi, UAE – XX August 2020 – Leveraging the synergies created by the convergence of electrification, automation and digitalisation, can create significant cost savings for oil and gas companies when making both operational and capital investment decisions, according to Dr Peter Terwiesch, President of Industrial Automation at ABB, a Swiss-Swedish multinational company, operating mainly in robotics, power, heavy electrical equipment, and automation technology areas.

Participating in the latest ADIPEC Energy Dialogue, Dr Terwiesch said up to 80 per cent of energy industry plant shutdowns, caused by human error, or rotating machinery or power outages, could be mitigated through a combination of electrification, automation and digitalisation.

“Savings are clearly possible not only on the operation side but also, using the same synergies between dimensions, you can bring down the cost schedule and risk of capital investment, especially in a time when making projects work economically is harder,” explained Dr Terwiesch.

A pioneering technology leader, who works closely with utility, industry, transportation and infrastructure customers, Dr Terwiesch said despite the increasing investment by oil and gas companies in renewables and the growing use of renewables to generate electricity, both for individual and industrial uses, hydrocarbons will continue to have an important role in creating energy, in the short to medium term.

“If you look at the energy density constraints, clearly electricity is gaining share but electricity is not the source of energy; it is a conduit of energy. The energy has to come from somewhere and that can be hydrocarbons, or nuclear, or renewables.” he said.

Nevertheless, he added, the greater use of renewables to generate electricity offers oil and gas companies the option of integrating a higher share of renewables into power management processes to create efficiencies, sustainability and affordability when modernising equipment, or planning new CAPEX projects.

The ADIPEC Energy Dialogue is a series of online thought leadership events created by dmg events, organisers of the annual Abu Dhabi International Exhibition and Conference. Featuring key stakeholders and decision-makers in the oil and gas industry, the dialogues focus on how the industry is evolving and transforming in response to the rapidly changing energy market.

With this year’s in person ADIPEC exhibition and conference postponed to November 2021, the ADIPEC Energy Dialogue, along with insightful webinars, podcasts and on line panels continue to connect the oil and gas industry, with the challenges and opportunities shaping energy markets in the run up to, and following, a planned three-day live stream virtual ADIPEC conference taking place from November 9-11.

An industry first of its kind, the online conference will bring together energy leaders, ministers and global oil and gas CEOs to assess the collective measures the industry needs to put in place to fast-track recovery, post COVID-19.

To watch the full ADIPEC Energy Dialogue series go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QZzUd32n3_s&t=6s

August, 12 2020
SHORT-TERM ENERGY OUTLOOK

Forecast Highlights

  • The August Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) remains subject to heightened levels of uncertainty because mitigation and reopening efforts related to the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continue to evolve. Reduced economic activity related to the COVID-19 pandemic has caused changes in energy demand and supply patterns in 2020. Uncertainties persist across the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) outlook for all energy sources, including liquid fuels, natural gas, electricity, coal, and renewables. The STEO is based on U.S. macroeconomic forecasts by IHS Markit, which assume U.S. gross domestic product declined by 5.2% in the first half of 2020 from the same period a year ago and will rise from the third quarter of 2020 through 2021.
  • Daily Brent crude oil spot prices averaged $43 per barrel (b) in July, up $3/b from the average in June and up $25/b from the multiyear low monthly average price in April. EIA expects monthly Brent spot prices will average $43/b during the second half of 2020 and rise to an average of $50/b in 2021.
  • U.S. regular gasoline retail prices averaged $2.18 per gallon (gal) in July, an increase of 10 cents/gal from the average in June but 56 cents/gal lower than at the same time last year. EIA expects that gasoline prices will gradually decrease through the rest of the summer to reach an average of $2.04/gal in September before falling to an average of $1.99/gal in the fourth quarter. Forecast U.S. regular gasoline retail prices will average $2.23/gal in 2021, compared with an average of $2.12/gal in 2020.
  • EIA expects high inventory levels and surplus crude oil production capacity will limit upward price pressures in the coming months, but as inventories decline into 2021, those upward price pressures will increase. EIA estimates global liquid fuels inventories rose at a rate of 6.4 million barrels per day (b/d) in the first half of 2020 and expects they will decline at a rate of 4.2 million b/d in the second half of 2020 and then decline by 0.8 million b/d in 2021.
  • EIA estimates that demand for global petroleum and liquid fuels averaged 93.4 million b/d in July. Demand was down 9.1 million b/d from July 2019, but it was up from an average of 85.0 million b/d during the second quarter of 2020, which was down 15.8 million b/d from year-ago levels. EIA forecasts that consumption of petroleum and liquid fuels globally will average 93.1 million b/d for all of 2020, down 8.1 million b/d from 2019, before increasing by 7.0 million b/d in 2021. Reduced economic activity related to the COVID-19 pandemic has caused changes in energy supply and demand patterns in 2020.
  • EIA estimates that global liquid fuels production averaged 91.8 million b/d in the second quarter of 2020, down 8.6 million b/d year over year. The decline reflects voluntary production cuts by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and partner countries (OPEC+), and reductions in drilling activity and production curtailments in the United States because of low oil prices. In the forecast, the global supply of oil continues to decline to 90.4 million b/d in the third quarter of 2020 before rising to an annual average of 99.4 million b/d in 2021.
  • EIA estimates that U.S. liquid fuels consumption averaged 16.2 million b/d in the second quarter of 2020, down 4.1 million b/d (20%) from the same period in 2019. The decline reflects travel restrictions and reduced economic activity related to COVID-19 mitigation efforts. EIA expects U.S. oil consumption will generally rise through the end of 2021. EIA forecasts U.S. liquid fuels consumption will average 18.9 million b/d in the third quarter of 2020 (down 1.8 million b/d year over year) before rising to an average of 20.0 million b/d in 2021. Although the 2021 forecast level is 1.6 million b/d more than EIA’s forecast 2020 consumption, it is 0.4 million b/d less than the 2019 average.
  • EIA has lowered U.S. crude oil production estimates for 2020 by 370,000 b/d from the previous STEO. EIA expects crude production to average 11.3 million b/d in 2020 and 11.1 million b/d in 2021, down from 12.2 million b/d in 2019. Recently released EIA data show that average monthly U.S. oil production for May was 1.2 million b/d lower than the July STEO forecast, indicating more extensive production curtailments than previously estimated. Also, EIA’s August STEO assumes that the Dakota Access Pipeline will remain operational. A U.S. District Court ordered on July 6 the temporary closure of the Dakota Access Pipeline beginning in early August. A U.S. appeals court has overturned the lower court decision, allowing the pipeline to remain running while further litigation proceedings continue.
  • In July, the Henry Hub natural gas spot price averaged $1.77 per million British thermal units (MMBtu). EIA expects natural gas prices will generally rise through the end of 2021 but the sharpest increases will be during this fall and winter when they rise from an average of $2.11/MMBtu in September to $3.14/MMBtu in February. EIA expects that rising demand heading into winter, combined with reduced production, will cause upward price pressures. EIA forecasts that Henry Hub natural gas spot prices will average $2.03/MMBtu in 2020 and $3.14/MMBtu in 2021.
  • EIA estimates that total U.S. working natural gas in storage ended July at about 3.3 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), 15% more than the five-year (2015–19) average. In the forecast, inventories rise by 2.0 Tcf during the April-through-October injection season to reach nearly 4.0 Tcf on October 31.
  • EIA expects that total U.S. consumption of natural gas will average 82.4 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) in 2020, down 3.0% from 2019. The largest decline in consumption occurs in the industrial sector, which EIA forecasts will average 22.0 Bcf/d in 2020, down 1.0 Bcf/d from 2019, as a result of reduced manufacturing activity. The decline in total U.S. consumption also reflects lower heating demand in early 2020, contributing to residential and commercial demand in 2020 averaging 12.8 Bcf/d (down 0.9 Bcf/d from 2019) and 8.8 Bcf/d (down 0.8 Bcf/d from 2019), respectively.
  • U.S. dry natural gas production set an annual record in 2019, averaging 92.2 Bcf/d. EIA forecasts dry natural gas production will average 88.7 Bcf/d in 2020, with monthly production falling from its monthly average peak of 96.2 Bcf/d in November 2019 to 82.7 Bcf/d by April 2021, before increasing slightly. Natural gas production declines the most in the Permian region, where EIA expects low crude oil prices will reduce associated natural gas output from oil-directed rigs. EIA’s forecast of dry natural gas production in the United States averages 84.0 Bcf/d in 2021. EIA expects production to begin rising in the second quarter of 2021 in response to higher natural gas and crude oil prices.
  • EIA estimates that U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports will average 5.5 Bcf/d in 2020 and will average 7.3 Bcf/d in 2021. EIA expects that U.S. LNG exports will decline through the end of the summer as a result of reduced global demand for natural gas. U.S. exports of LNG in July 2020 averaged 3.1 Bcf/d, which is about the same as in May 2018, when the available liquefaction capacity was about one-third of the current capacity. Declines in global natural gas demand associated with COVID-19 mitigation efforts, high natural gas storage inventories in Europe and Asia, and an on-going expansion in LNG liquefaction capacity have contributed to natural gas and LNG prices reaching all-time historical lows. Low international prices have affected the economic competitiveness of U.S. LNG exports and have led to numerous cargo cancellations, particularly at the Sabine Pass, Corpus Christi, and Freeport LNG export terminals. EIA expects LNG exports from the United States to remain low in the next few months. Based on numerous trade press reports, EIA estimates about 45 cargoes have been canceled for upcoming August shipments and about 30 cargoes have been canceled for September shipments.
  • EIA forecasts 3.6% less electricity consumption in the United States in 2020 compared with 2019. The largest decline on a percentage basis is in the commercial sector, where EIA expects retail sales of electricity to fall by 7.4% this year. Forecast industrial retail electricity sales fall by 5.8%. EIA forecasts residential sector retail sales will increase by 2.0% in 2020. Milder winter temperatures earlier in the year led to lower consumption for space heating, but that factor is offset by increased summer cooling demand and an assumed increase in electricity use by more people working from home. In 2021, EIA forecasts total U.S. electricity consumption will rise by 0.8%.
  • EIA expects the share of U.S. electric power sector generation from natural gas-fired power plants will increase from 37% in 2019 to 40% this year. In 2021, the forecast natural gas share declines to 35% in response to higher natural gas prices. Coal’s forecast share of electricity generation falls from 24% in 2019 to 18% in 2020 and then increases to 22% in 2021. Electricity generation from renewable energy sources rises from 17% in 2019 to 20% in 2020 and to 22% in 2021. The increase in the share from renewables is the result of expected additions to wind and solar generating capacity. EIA expects a decline in nuclear generation in both 2020 and 2021, reflecting recent and upcoming retirements of nuclear generating capacity.
  • EIA forecasts that renewable energy will be the fastest-growing source of electricity generation in 2020. EIA expects the electric power sector will add 23.2 gigawatts (GW) of new wind capacity and 12.9 GW of utility-scale solar capacity in 2020. However, these future capacity additions are subject to a high degree of uncertainty, and EIA continues to monitor reported planned capacity builds.
  • U.S. coal consumption, which dropped to its lowest point since April, totaled 95 MMst in the second quarter of 2020. EIA expects coal consumption to rise to a seasonal peak of 127 MMst in the third quarter but remain lower than 2019 levels through the end of 2020. EIA estimates that U.S. coal consumption will decrease by 26% in 2020 and increase by 20% in 2021. EIA estimates that total U.S. coal production in 2020 will decrease by 29% from 2019 levels to 502 MMst. In 2021, EIA expects higher demand and rising natural gas prices to a lead to a recovery in coal production of 12%, with a total annual production level of 564 MMst.
  • EIA forecasts that U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, after decreasing by 2.8% in 2019, will decrease by 11.5% (588 million metric tons) in 2020. This record decline is the result of less energy consumption related to restrictions on business and travel activity and slowing economic growth related to COVID-19 mitigation efforts. CO2 emissions decline with reduced consumption of all fossil fuels, particularly coal (24.9%) and petroleum (11.6%). In 2021, EIA forecasts that energy-related CO2 emissions will increase by 5.6%, as the economy recovers and stay-at-home orders are lifted. Energy-related CO2 emissions are sensitive to changes in weather, economic growth, energy prices, and fuel mix.
August, 12 2020
Utility-scale battery storage capacity continued its upward trend in 2018

Utility-scale battery storage systems are increasingly being installed in the United States. In 2010, the United States had seven operational battery storage systems, which accounted for 59 megawatts (MW) of power capacity (the maximum amount of power output a battery can provide in any instant) and 21 megawatthours (MWh) of energy capacity (the total amount of energy that can be stored or discharged by a battery). By the end of 2018, the United States had 125 operational battery storage systems, providing a total of 869 MW of installed power capacity and 1,236 MWh of energy capacity.

Battery storage systems store electricity produced by generators or pulled directly from the electrical grid, and they redistribute the power later as needed. These systems have a wide variety of applications, including integrating renewables into the grid, peak shaving, frequency regulation, and providing backup power.

annual utility-scale battery storage capacity additions by region

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory and Annual Electric Generator Report

Most utility-scale battery storage capacity is installed in regions covered by independent system operators (ISOs) or regional transmission organizations (RTOs). Historically, most battery systems are in the PJM Interconnection (PJM), which manages the power grid in 13 eastern and Midwestern states as well as the District of Columbia, and in the California Independent System Operator (CAISO). Together, PJM and CAISO accounted for 55% of the total battery storage power capacity built between 2010 and 2018. However, in 2018, more than 58% (130 MW) of new storage power capacity additions, representing 69% (337 MWh) of energy capacity additions, were installed in states outside of those areas.

In 2018, many regions outside of CAISO and PJM began adding greater amounts of battery storage capacity to their power grids, including Alaska and Hawaii, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and the Midcontinent Independent System Operator (MISO). Many of the additions were the result of procurement requirements, financial incentives, and long-term planning mechanisms that promote the use of energy storage in the respective states. Alaska and Hawaii, which have isolated power grids, are expanding battery storage capacity to increase grid reliability and reduce dependence on expensive fossil fuel imports.

total installed cost of utility-scale battery systems by year

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, Annual Electric Generator Report
Note: The cost range represents cost data elements from the 25th to 75th percentiles for each year of reported cost data.

Average costs per unit of energy capacity decreased 61% between 2015 and 2017, dropping from $2,153 per kilowatthour (kWh) to $834 per kWh. The large decrease in cost makes battery storage more economical, helping accelerate capacity growth. Affordable battery storage also plays an important role in the continued integration of storage with intermittent renewable electricity sources such as wind and solar.

Additional information on these topics is available in the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) recently updated Battery Storage in the United States: An Update on Market Trends. This report explores trends in battery storage capacity additions and describes the current state of the market, including information on applications, cost, market and policy drivers, and future project developments.

August, 11 2020