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Last Updated: November 29, 2017
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Petroleum Geoscience
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Abd Rasid Jaapar is the President of Geological Society of Malaysia (GSM), which was founded in 1967 with the aim of promoting the advancement of the earth sciences in Malaysia and the Southeast Asian (S.E.A) region. Abd Rasid is also the Managing Director of Geomapping Technology Sdn Bhd, and Chief Operating Officer for OST Slope Protection Engineering (M) Sdn Bhd.

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Abd Rasid Jaapar, GSM President


  1. You’re someone who has put on many professional hats – you’re the Managing Director of Geomapping Technology Sdn Bhd, President of Geology Society of Malaysia, and you’re also the COO of Slope Protection Engineering Sdn Mhd. How do you find the passion to keep going in this industry? What keeps you motivated?
    First, of course my family. You need to keep going because of them. Second, I truly enjoy what I do. If you enjoy your work, everything else will fall into place. When we work for money, we will get money but when we work for something we love, we will feel great and the money will come to you more easily.

  2. As an industry expert, you have had considerable experience in the field of geotechnical engineering, environmental geology, and hydrogeology from onshore to offshore. For someone who’s just beginning their career in the industry, what advice can you give him or her? How do you keep elevating or improving yourself if you want to stay ahead of the game?
    If you are serious in building your career, try to start with a smaller company. Being a contractor is your best bet because in a small contracting company, you will learn a lot about the different aspects of various jobs in the company. After 2 to 3 years, you can move on to a consulting company where you learn to analyse and interpret the data that you have. After a couple more years, take a break to pursue your second degree to specialise in a specific field of geology that you’re interested in. By then you should be mature enough to decide where you want to be in the next phase of your career. Join a big corporation, create your own business or teach in a university? With the experiences and additional degree that you have acquired, the sky is the limit!

  3.  Have you faced any obstacles or challenges in your career? What did you learn from overcoming these challenges?
    The biggest challenge is communication especially with other professionals. I had the opportunity to work in construction as well as oil & gas industries. In the construction industry, geologist functions are limited with perhaps lower pay compared to other professionals. It is different in the oil & gas industry, where almost every professional is equally respected with specific functions.

    Over the years, I realised that we are paid for what we can do, not for who we are. If you are good at what you do, no matter who you are, you will be rewarded. I think the co-curriculum activities that I was involved in during secondary school and university helped me a lot in developing my soft skills; communications, management, leadership, etc. Just be excellent in what you do, not only as a geologist but as a geologist who can communicate knowledge well to others.

  4. I’m sure you have travelled to many different countries and places in your line of work. Can you share what was the most memorable work experience you had in the foreign land that was so different from Malaysia?
    Every country has different cultures and challenges. In Indonesia, sometimes we have to organise a ‘feast’ with the locals to ensure that our work will not face any obstacles. In one occasion, we had to do a ‘sacrificial ceremony’ to the Goddess of Sea, Nyi Roro Kidul following local customs. Like it or not, we have to adapt to the culture.

    The biggest challenge was to complete the work in Caspian Sea in Turkmenistan territory in 2009-2010. The preparation and mobilisation had to be done from Baku, Azerbaijan due to logistics and political issues. At that time, Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan were not in good terms, politically. Managing third parties in between Azerbaijan and Turkmenistan was very challenging indeed. In the end, we managed to complete the work albeit with a month’s delay.

  5. Is there a future in Geology in the energy industry? How do you think the industry will fare in the next 10-20 years? 
    Yes, of course. History repeats itself, and so will the fluctuation of oil price. It is a cycle indeed. I believe we have enjoyed the longest period of good and stable oil price in history before the crisis. The challenges will still be in exploration in deep water and marginal fields. I am certain that the industry will react by coming up with new methods or technologies suited to operate at a much lower operating cost.

  6. There have been recent articles claiming millennials do not find working in the energy, oil and gas industry attractive. How do you think we can keep millennials interested in the field?
    After the downfall of oil price in 2015, the situation faced in almost every oil & gas related company was indeed terrifying. Many employees were dismissed abruptly. Employees felt discouraged as they were once the heroes in the company but suddenly they were left without jobs. The workforce in oil, gas and energy was severely impacted and the industry will eventually need to scour for newcomers and train them from scratch.

    To attract graduates, the industry as a whole needs to work harder in terms of promoting jobs, perhaps looking at more targeted ways of acquiring new talents. The salary range needs to be reasonable. And as mentioned, more training needs to be done to prepare the fresh graduates for their careers. We need to show that the industry cares for the workforce. Over time, I believe that the market will recover and the oil, gas and energy industry will thrive again.

  7. You are a prominent figure in the industry, and many look up to you. Has your professional network been important in getting you where you are today? Also, other than the workplace, where should one start building their professional network?
    Yes, networking is important in business and professional development. Again, it must start with communication. Through good communication, you are building your network of connections. We must be open minded and take the opportunity to connect with everybody. In professional and business life, there are no enemies per se, only competitors. One day, the competitors may become your strategic allies. You must always be respectful of others. Professionals need to get involved with professional development programs such as seminars, conferences, trainings, etc. Professional and learned associations help in networking so you should become a member of any of these organisations. The alumni association of your alma mater can also be a good networking place.

  8. Do you feel that youths today have more opportunities given global connectivity? How do you think they should capitalize on this?
    Yes. With technology, the opportunities are endless. Don’t underestimate the youths. They are creative and look at things differently. We are in a borderless world now, so to speak, so for those who are innovative and can create trends will succeed almost instantly and youngsters should capitalise on this.

  9. Is there anything else that is on your bucket list or goals you want to achieve in your life/career?
    For me, I just want to see all my kids excel in their life. In the professional realm, I want to see the Geologist Act 2008 really give impact to enhance the professionalism and profile of all geologists in Malaysia. I also want to see my field of expertise in geology, i.e. engineering geology, being practiced the best it can to its fullest potential in the country.

  10. We all know what they say about all work and no play. What do you enjoy doing in your free time?
    With friends at this age, I enjoy playing golf or futsal or just having Teh Tarik, discussing about politics, our children’s future and what men like to discuss the most…every man knows…ha ha ha!
    With family, I love to spend time traveling with them. I enjoy strengthening our family bond through travelling.

  11. If you were not doing what you’re doing now, what do you think you would have become?

    Lecturer, motivator or maybe event organiser.


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operating natural-gas fired electric generating capacity by online year

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Electric Generator Inventory

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natural gas-fired electric gnerating capacity by retirement year

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Electric Generator Inventory

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operating natural gas-fired electric generating capacity in selected states

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Electric Generator Inventory

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global energy consumption for power generation

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, International Energy Outlook 2020 (IEO2020)

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Asia infographic, as described in the article text


Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, International Energy Outlook 2020 (IEO2020)
Note: Click to enlarge.

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