Ratko Vasiljević

Leading Geologist in ECOINA Ltd
Last Updated: March 12, 2018
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Gas & LNG
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Pre conference troduction

Mart 7 and Mart 8 CEE (Central and East European) Gas Conference will be held in Zagreb Croatia. The title of conference is 8 predictions on the future of the Central & Eastern European gas market. The conference will The bring together regional and international industry stakeholders, gas suppliers, TSOs, regulators, government members, commercial executives and industry consultants - to share insights, meet new and existing customers and suppliers, and capitalise on the opportunities presented by these dynamic markets.

The conference is organised by Croatian national Oil Company INA, East West Institute, Energy Community, LNG Croatia, LNG Allies, Tellurian, National Croatian Gas Distribution Company – Plinacro and CEGH.

The Conference comes in time when Gas production in Croatia from Pannonian Basin and North Adriatic Offshore has trend of decrease. At the moment, domestic production satisfies approximately 60% of Croatian needs, but without further investment in Exploration and Production, this percentage will decrease, and in the future Croatian dependences on imported gas will grow.

Certain reserves of gas can be storage in Underground Gas Storage Okoli, and in the future is new peak Underground Gas Storage is planned.

Another supply direction is planned from new floating LNG terminal that should be installed at Island Krk (Primorsko – Goranska County).

This conference comes only four days after demonstration against new LNG terminal were held in Rijeka City, the capitol of the Primorsko Goranska County.

Regarding all emerging issues, I expect to see interesting discussion at this conference.

At the end, special thanks to the Company NRG Edge, Singapore ( www.nrgedge.net ), that enables me to be there as their representative. 


CEE Gas Conference Day 1. 

CEE Gas Conference, Hotel Sheraton, Zagreb.  

Gas conference started wary intensively, after Welcome words by Organiser, Minister of Economy And president of the board of the Croatian national oil company INA, sessions started with LNG Croatia Keynote by Goran Frančić, Managing Director LNG Croatia.

The most important information’s were on public discussion on Environmental Impact Assessment on LNG Terminal in Omišalj (Island Krk) held on Monday.

According to dynamics, they expect location permit by the end of April, and expected finalising the project was predicted by the end of 2019.

At the moment conceptual project is finalized, and the main project is ongoing.

Due economical feasibility, according to National energetic institute Hrvoje Požar, it is expected to be feasible in capacities between 700 x 106 Sm3/year to 900 x 106 Sm3/year.

Since the present domestic production of gas at the moment satisfies 40% of needs, 60 % came from the import, mostly from Russian Federation.

LNG in long term will enable diversification of supply and consequently expected decrease of prices.

In spite that LNG ensure more expensive gas than pipeline, for LNG terminal it needs to be liquefied and after gasified, supply by pipeline is often covered by risks of global political situation, unfair prices, etc. The good example was the problem of Russian Gas supply through the Ukraine several years ago.

At the territory of European Union, at the moment 25 LNG terminals are operative, and which can increase the offer of natural gas, respectively, LNG terminals can be a factor of price and supply balance.

The main question on LNG terminal is sustainability, which depends of price, time of installation and total capacity. One negative example is LNG terminal in Tuscany, built in relatively long period of 5 years with total expenses of about   850 x 106 EUR.

With maximum expected expenses for LNG terminal in Omišalj of about 200 x 106 EUR, it should be feasible in capacities of about 109 Sm3/year .

Spreading of market for LNG has a big space in transportation sector, for example, large Italian truck producer IVECO, produce LNG driven vehicles.

LNG terminal at Island Krk will be performed in two phases, in the first phase it is planned to be installed offshore as floating terminal with total capacity of 5 – 6   x 109 Sm3/year , and in second phase it is planned to be installed onshore with total capacity of 6 – 8   x 109 Sm3/year. The main problem of location of the LNG terminal was a land owning. More than year ago, the owners weren’t even known so to avoid problems with interrupting properties, it was planned to install offshore terminal. During the last year, all surfaces was bought, so onshore LNG terminal, as previously was planned, and was chosen to be built.

Since the LNG business is according to opinion of majority of visitors is driven by politics rather than market, it was suggested to rebrand LNG project from Croatian to regional or EU project, which will enable integration of non EU countries into the system (Serbia, Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, etc.).  The main problems in that part are bureaucracy and infrastructure. In this part it was pointed as a question what was first chicken or egg, respectively, what should be first infrastructure or the offer?

The other problem is legislative, possible new more restrictive environmental legislative for Mediterranean area,  the similar problem appeared in Poland where new legislative literarily driven majority of energetic investors out of country, from 14 of them, only 2 or 3 left.

The environmental regulative for EU predicts a use of natural gas as a transfer fuel toward renewable in next 20 to 25 years, and use of natural gas was planned to decrease. This represents a problem for investments in new pipelines, roads, etc, since this is a relatively short period. In spite of that it is expected that gas demand will grow, and price will depend primarily on Chinese needs.

USA has the great interests on LNG export, since they expect significant increase of shale gas production in following years.  Their formal attitude is that they don’t force anyone for buying their LNG since them already has a big market in South America and Asia.

At the moment in Croatia, domestic gas production decreases rapidly so it will be necessarily to invest in further exploration and production. The most perspective area is Adriatic offshore, but the further investigation is expensive. So national Croatian Oil company INA, search for partners, but applications are expected after new Law on Hydrocarbons will be ratified in Parliament, which can be done even by the end of March.


CEE Gas Conference Day 2. 

CEE Gas Conference, Hotel Sheraton, Zagreb.  

Second day of the conference was planned to encircle question oh transportation, regulatory framework, forming of prices at the market, hubs and regulations.

Regarding traffic issue, it was pointed that this topic in the past usually wasn’t considered, or if it was it was mostly at the margins. At this conference transportation issue was a part of it, and in the future it is expected that it will be more and more important.

 At European Union CO2 emissions reached a level from 1999, only in traffic sector they have a trend of growth. This is important since 1/3 of all CO2 emissions came from traffic. At the maritime traffic, regulation on protection of Mediterranean Sea (MARPOL Convention) requires continuous decrease of the pollutant.

Maritime traffic was recognised as a great market niche for the LNG, but at the conference was pointed a question on Chicken or Egg, does ships needs to be driven by LNG or to install appropriate terminals first? Of course it would be ideal if it would be simultaneously.

Generally after investment in maritime transport, there is a lot of space for spreading LNG toward a road transportation, which was recognised in Italy, so their truck producer IVECO started to produce trucks driven by the LNG, recently Scania and Volvo joined into race, and Volvo developed a truck driven by new bi fuel engine, diesel and LNG. In Italy it is expected that 1 million tons of LNG per year will be used in traffic by 2030.

The main problem for the LNG market in Europe is a regulation, first of all the regulatory is issued in Bruxelles. At the moment, it is expected that energy efficiency will rise up to 35% by 2030, and new upcoming regulative on Renewable energy and Energy efficiency will influence to the business in the future.

The main spreading of the LNG infrastructure is expected to be between 2025 and 2035, and it is important to include all stakeholders, distributors, final users, traders, etc. That means the LNG represents a big business opportunity in the future.

The issue of LNG prices is a question should it be regulated according to oil prices, should it be separated from oil, should it be regulated by state or by market?

State monopoly doesn’t allow creation of market price, but if gas business turns from national to regional, what is a vision of the EU, it will enable to include more players on the market, attract investors, create more hubs which will enable greater flexibility in gas supply. In this constellation upstream can also jump in directly to distribution on the market.

In spite of importance of market influence, energetic projects can’t be a 100% market driven because they need to ensure security of distribution toward final users.

Some options of financing are private financing, financing by European Bank Of Reconstruction and Development, Structural Funds, Horizon 2020 (Only for research).

European Investment Bank is interested in financing of such projects, and between 2014 and 2016 it financed a gas infrastructure in 1.6 billion euro. For application of financing, EIB in energy projects, take a special care to Carbon Footprint and their threshold for financing is 150 g of CO2 per kWh.


Post conference Conclusion

The main target of the CEE gas conference in Zagreb was development of the LNG – terminals, infrastructure, discussion of potential market chances. LNG represents more expensive option in compare to pipeline gas. On the other hand it enables flexibility of gas supply, and decrease potential risks of global politic situation, which are higher in pipeline transport. On the other hand potential solution for feasibility achievement are market spreading toward border and non EU countries, toward a new sectors such as production of electricity and a new fuel for transportation. These projects in Croatia are unfortunately influenced by politics which can use a demonstration for collecting points. The main issue in Croatia is still a communication between investors and stakeholders. At the moment I prepare this report, demonstrations against new LNG terminal in Omišalj (Island Krk) were held. New LNG terminal brings more expensive gas, but in the other hand enable diversification of supply. This will be important in upcoming years due depletion of domestic gas production. In the introduction I wrote that domestic production covers approx. 60% of gas needs (2 years old data), but at the conference it was pointed that today it covers no more than 40% and still decline.

 New LNG project can set Croatia as a regional leader in energy distribution, but it should be performed fast and efficient.

Prepared by

Dr.Sc. Ratko Vasiljević, Grad.Eng.Geol.

LNG Gas Central East Europe Traffic Hub Gas Market
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EIA expects U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions to decrease annually through 2021

In its latest Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), released on January 14, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) forecasts year-over-year decreases in energy-related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions through 2021. After decreasing by 2.1% in 2019, energy-related CO2 emissions will decrease by 2.0% in 2020 and again by 1.5% in 2021 for a third consecutive year of declines.

These declines come after an increase in 2018 when weather-related factors caused energy-related CO2 emissions to rise by 2.9%. If this forecast holds, energy-related CO2 emissions will have declined in 7 of the 10 years from 2012 to 2021. With the forecast declines, the 2021 level of fewer than 5 billion metric tons would be the first time emissions have been at that level since 1991.

After a slight decline in 2019, EIA expects petroleum-related CO2 emissions to be flat in 2020 and decline slightly in 2021. The transportation sector uses more than two-thirds of total U.S. petroleum consumption. Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) grow nearly 1% annually during the forecast period. In the short term, increases in VMT are largely offset by increases in vehicle efficiency.

Winter temperatures in New England, which were colder than normal in 2019, led to increased petroleum consumption for heating. New England uses more petroleum as a heating fuel than other parts of the United States. EIA expects winter temperatures will revert to normal, contributing to a flattening in overall petroleum demand.

Natural gas-related CO2 increased by 4.2% in 2019, and EIA expects that it will rise by 1.4% in 2020. However, EIA expects a 1.7% decline in natural gas-related CO2 in 2021 because of warmer winter weather and less demand for natural gas for heating.

Changes in the relative prices of coal and natural gas can cause fuel switching in the electric power sector. Small price changes can yield relatively large shifts in generation shares between coal and natural gas. EIA expects coal-related CO2 will decline by 10.8% in 2020 after declining by 12.7% in 2019 because of low natural gas prices. EIA expects the rate of coal-related CO2 to decline to be less in 2021 at 2.7%.

The declines in CO2 emissions are driven by two factors that continue from recent historical trends. EIA expects that less carbon-intensive and more efficient natural gas-fired generation will replace coal-fired generation and that generation from renewable energy—especially wind and solar—will increase.

As total generation declines during the forecast period, increases in renewable generation decrease the share of fossil-fueled generation. EIA estimates that coal and natural gas electric generation combined, which had a 63% share of generation in 2018, fell to 62% in 2019 and will drop to 59% in 2020 and 58% in 2021.

Coal-fired generation alone has fallen from 28% in 2018 to 24% in 2019 and will fall further to 21% in 2020 and 2021. The natural gas-fired generation share rises from 37% in 2019 to 38% in 2020, but it declines to 37% in 2021. In general, when the share of natural gas increases relative to coal, the carbon intensity of the electricity supply decreases. Increasing the share of renewable generation further decreases the carbon intensity.

U.S. annual carbon emissions by source

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, January 2020
Note: CO2 is carbon dioxide.

January, 21 2020
Latest issue of GEO ExPro magazine covers Europe and Frontier Exploration, Modelling and Mapping, and Geochemistry.

GEO ExPro Vol. 16, No. 6 was published on 9th December 2019 bringing light to the latest science and technology activity in the global geoscience community within the oil, gas and energy sector.

This issue focusses on oil and gas exploration in frontier regions within Europe, with stories and articles discussing new modelling and mapping technologies available to the industry. This issue also presents several articles discussing the discipline of geochemistry and how it can be used to further enhance hydrocarbon exploration.

You can download the PDF of GEO ExPro magazine for FREE and sign up to GEO ExPro’s weekly updates and online exclusives to receive the latest articles direct to your inbox.

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January, 20 2020
Your Weekly Update: 13 - 17 January 2020

Market Watch   

Headline crude prices for the week beginning 13 January 2020 – Brent: US$64/b; WTI: US$59/b

  • Tensions in the Persian Gulf have abated, but not disappeared, as both the US and Iran stepped back from going to war; the buck, so far, has stopped with Tehran’s retaliation to the US assassination of its top general with a barrage of missile strikes at US bases in Iraq
  • The underlying situation is still fragile, with the Iranian population swinging from supporting the government to protesting its accidental downing of a commercial Ukraine Airlines plane; with the risk of war easing, crude prices have fallen back to their pre-crisis levels
  • However, American and foreign oil companies have pulled their staff from crude fields in northern Iraq and Kurdistan, including Chevron, as the oil industry in Iraq monitors the risk – and consequences – of military action
  • In precaution, oil tankers have begun boosting their rates once again to haul crude through the Persian Gulf, with quoted rates now at their highest level since the 2019 attacks on ships passing through the narrow straight
  • Although political tensions remain fresh, Saudi Arabia said that OPEC and the OPEC+ club were instead focused on using their window of production cuts to reduce excess oil stockpiles to levels ‘within the contours of 2010-2014’
  • In the US, not only is shale output staying strong, but production in the US Gulf of Mexico also made history, exceeding 2 mmb/d for the first time ever in 2019, beating the previous high recorded in 2018
  • Worries about the health of global oil demand persist… although the US and China signed a Phase 1 trade deal, the agreement is more about halting escalation of the trade war than repairing inflicted damage; a slowdown in Chinese economic growth could lead to oil demand growth halving in 2020 in China according to CNPC
  • The US active rig count fell for a second consecutive week, losing 15 rigs – 11 oil and 4 gas – for the 17th weekly decline of the past 20 weeks; losses in the Permian were once again high, shedding a total of 6 rigs
  • Crude oil prices should remain rangebound with Brent at US$63-65/b and WTI at US$57-59/b, as the market retreats back to its ever-present worries about demand while geopolitical risk premiums scale back


Headlines of the week

Upstream

  • Guyana’s success is now extending to its neighbours, with Total and Apache announcing a ‘significant’ oil discovery at their Maka Central-1 well in Suriname’s Block 58, which lies adjacent to the prolific Stabroek Block
  • BP has agreed to sell its operating interest in the UK North Sea’s Andrew assets – including the Andrew platform as well as the Andrew, Arundel, Cyrus, Farragon, and Kinnoull fields – along with its 27.5% non-operating interest in the Shearwater field to Premier Oil for some US$625 million
  • Liberia will kick start its next offshore licensing round in April 2020, offering nine blocks in the Harper basin, one of the few offshore regions in West Africa that remains unexplored and undrilled
  • Equinor has extended the life of its Statfjord assets beyond 2030, with plans to commission up to 100 new wells over the next decade, deferring decommissioning with a goal of maintaining current output levels beyond 2025
  • After Murphy Oil, Petrofac and ExxonMobil, Repsol is the latest major considering an upstream exit from Malaysia, covering assets that include six development blocks and the major Kinabalu oilfield in Sabah
  • Senegal’s government has approved Woodside’s offshore Sangomar Field Development, which will involve the drilling of 23 subsea wells and a FPSO with the capacity to process up to 100,000 b/d of crude
  • Equinor has announced plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its offshore fields and onshore plants in Norway by 40% by 2030, 70% by 2040 and to near zero by 2050 from 2019 levels

Midstream/Downstream

  • Shell is reportedly seeking buyers for its 144 kb/d Anacortes refinery in Washington state, which would be its third North American sale in two years after divesting its Martinez refinery in California and Sarnia refinery in Ontario
  • Shell has announced plans to increase its share of the Mexican fuel market to 15%, which would require considerable growth in its network of 200 fuel stations in 12 states that currently represent 1% of the market
  • Occidental Petroleum plans to reduce its holdings in Western Midstream Partners – acquired as part of its controversial takeover of Anadarko – to less than 50%, potentially removing up to US$7.8 billion of debt

Natural Gas/LNG

  • Sempra Energy and Saudi Aramco have signed an agreement that will see the Saudi giant play a bigger part in the planned 22 million tpa Port Arthurt LNG project, following an existing agreement to purchase 5 mtpa signed in May 2019
  • Kuwait Petroleum Corp has agreed to purchase 3 million tpa of LNG from Qatar Petroleum for 15 years beginning 2022, with Kuwait remaining one of the few countries in the Middle East that remain neutral to the Saudi-Qatar standoff
  • ExxonMobil has signed an agreement with midstream company Outrigger Energy II to build a 250 mmscf/d cryogenic gas processing, gathering and pipeline system in the Bakken’s Williston Basin in North Dakota
  • The Larak gas field in Sarawak has achieved first gas, operated by SapuraOMV Upstream as part of the SK408 PSC that includes the Gorek and Bakong fields, with output planned to be processed into LNG at Petronas’ Bintulu complex
  • Russia’s TurkStream natural gas pipeline – connecting Russia, Turkey, Bulgaria and eventually Serbia and Hungary - has officially begun operations, delivering up to 13 bcm of Russian gas that can be rerouted from the Ukraine route
January, 17 2020