Hui Shan

Job Steward at NrgEdge. If you are an Energy Professional (Oil, Gas, Energy) contact me for opportunities
Last Updated: September 13, 2018
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Career Development
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This is an exciting time for energy professionals, especially for all those who are looking for a job change within the oil and gas industry!

The current year is already witnessing a steady rise in the oil prices and the number of LNG projects thus painting a positive picture for the future.

Additionally, industry experts say, that the trend of employing temporary and contractual staff on an ongoing basis will continue to grow by 24%, which up by 1% than the previous year.


The profiles which will be in demand include:

  • Skilled Operator Maintainers to carry out operation, production and maintenance activities on various production plants.
  • Geologists, company representatives, drillers and rig crews in exploration
  • Cost and Planning Engineers in the downstream segment
  • Gas Insertion Workers in an active residential construction market
  • Engineering Service Managers, technicians and mechanical fitters in line maintenance and engineering services
  • Engineers from various disciplines: mechanical, electrical and control systems engineers, pipeline engineers, and project engineers.

Looking at the studies and profiles in demand, it is evident that there is immense scope in the industry and if one is looking for a job change, this could be an ideal time.

Opportunities, however, may come with a caveat and hence it is important to understand the pros and cons associated with switching jobs to make an informed decision.


Getting started: Gain clarity

Before you hand over your resignation letter, it is important to determine if a career change is a good move. Start by answering a few questions:

  • What are your interests and specific career goals?
  • Why do you want to switch to another company?
  • What does your financial statement say? Can you switch without causing undue stress?
  • Is your family happy with your decision? How does it impact them?


Dos for job hopping in the oil and gas sector

Regardless of your current job, your academic proficiency and your work history the oil and gas industry offers numerous opportunities. However, it is important to pick the one that will propel you to success.


DO – Know your options

The lifecycle of an oil and gas project moves from the conceptualization stage to the decommissioning phase. There are different levels in between and each of them requires a different skillset.

This industry is open to talented professionals, which means that if you are willing to learn you can easily climb the career ladder and even explore lateral movements to newer functions.

For instance, if you do not like working on offshore rigs, but are a technology enthusiast, you can switch to digital lead roles by completing a relevant certification.


DO – Intensive research

Since you are planning to move to another company, research becomes crucial for your personal as well as professional growth.

Start with researching the disciplines that are in high demand, the best companies to work for, covering your interest domain, company policies, work visa requirements and other government regulations.

While Houston, Abu Dhabi, and Perth are hotspots for exploration and production activities, new opportunities are emerging in countries like Malaysia, Mexico, and Mozambique.

Furthermore, speak to industry experts, and learn about the benefits and loopholes. The more you know, the better decision you will make.


DO – Compare the benefits

Learn about the benefits that you avail in your current job vis-à-vis the gains you will enjoy in your next job.

Begin by comparing the obvious: your compensation. As per the 2018-19 Hays Salary guide, 57% of oil and gas professionals will get a minimum of 3% rise in their next review while 21% of employers won’t increase your salary at all.

Learn where you belong and what are your chances of growth in your current organization. Once you have the number, compare it with the compensation that you are expecting in your new job.

Make sure you include the cost of living and the work-life balance in your decision-making. Apart from direct monetary benefits also compare additional benefits like working hours, job flexibility, growth prospects, insurance benefits, and other bonuses and allowances.


Don’ts for job hopping in oil and gas sector

It is important to know what might go wrong and how it can be avoided to keep the decision-making simple and easy.


DON’T – Be intimidated

The competition in the oil and gas industry is fierce. The industry requires highly skilled and experienced professionals and it is recommended that one keeps upgrading one’s skills as the demand shifts.

This dynamism in the industry often intimidates the professionals. Therefore, the idea here is to understand your potential, market value, and the expected competency. If you fit the bill, then you must consider switching.

However, if you identify a knowledge or skill gap, then it is advisable to gain the required expertise and then plan the job change. This ensures that you do not settle for less.


DON’T- Risk your safety

Safety parameters and guidelines are crucial in the oil and gas sector. Learn about the safety policies, employee benefits and the insurance policy of the company you are planning to join.

Gather references if possible from existing or former employees on how they treat their workforce to avoid work-related injuries, accidents, and diseases.


DON’T – Compromise on your stability 

One should have the right reason to switch. Often employees quit due to boredom and monotony at work and then later regret their decision.

Therefore, if you are planning to quit for growth opportunities or better exposure, it is crucial to analyze rationally if you will achieve what you are aiming for in your new job.

Additionally, if you are not sure about the new work environment or the growth potential, then it will be wise to drop the plan until you have clarity and extensive knowledge.

But do keep looking for more suitable options. Switch only when you are sure. Compromising stability may cost you your career.

The best part about the energy sector is that if you are willing to do hard work, there isn't any dearth of opportunities. It offers a lucrative salary, travelling, stability and growth opportunity. Just weigh the pros and cons of your career decision and you are good to go!

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In 2018, the United States consumed more energy than ever before

U.S. total energy consumption

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review

Primary energy consumption in the United States reached a record high of 101.3 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2018, up 4% from 2017 and 0.3% above the previous record set in 2007. The increase in 2018 was the largest increase in energy consumption, in both absolute and percentage terms, since 2010.

Consumption of fossil fuels—petroleum, natural gas, and coal—grew by 4% in 2018 and accounted for 80% of U.S. total energy consumption. Natural gas consumption reached a record high, rising by 10% from 2017. This increase in natural gas, along with relatively smaller increases in the consumption of petroleum fuels, renewable energy, and nuclear electric power, more than offset a 4% decline in coal consumption.

U.S. total energy consumption

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review

Petroleum consumption in the United States increased to 20.5 million barrels per day (b/d), or 37 quadrillion Btu in 2018, up nearly 500,000 b/d from 2017 and the highest level since 2007. Growth was driven primarily by increased use in the industrial sector, which grew by about 200,000 b/d in 2018. The transportation sector grew by about 140,000 b/d in 2018 as a result of increased demand for fuels such as petroleum diesel and jet fuel.

Natural gas consumption in the United States reached a record high 83.1 billion cubic feet/day (Bcf/d), the equivalent of 31 quadrillion Btu, in 2018. Natural gas use rose across all sectors in 2018, primarily driven by weather-related factors that increased demand for space heating during the winter and for air conditioning during the summer. As more natural gas-fired power plants came online and existing natural gas-fired power plants were used more often, natural gas consumption in the electric power sector increased 15% from 2017 levels to 29.1 Bcf/d. Natural gas consumption also grew in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in 2018, increasing 13%, 10%, and 4% compared with 2017 levels, respectively.

Coal consumption in the United States fell to 688 million short tons (13 quadrillion Btu) in 2018, the fifth consecutive year of decline. Almost all of the reduction came from the electric power sector, which fell 4% from 2017 levels. Coal-fired power plants continued to be displaced by newer, more efficient natural gas and renewable power generation sources. In 2018, 12.9 gigawatts (GW) of coal-fired capacity were retired, while 14.6 GW of net natural gas-fired capacity were added.

U.S. fossil fuel energy consumption by sector

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review

Renewable energy consumption in the United States reached a record high 11.5 quadrillion Btu in 2018, rising 3% from 2017, largely driven by the addition of new wind and solar power plants. Wind electricity consumption increased by 8% while solar consumption rose 22%. Biomass consumption, primarily in the form of transportation fuels such as fuel ethanol and biodiesel, accounted for 45% of all renewable consumption in 2018, up 1% from 2017 levels. Increases in wind, solar, and biomass consumption were partially offset by a 3% decrease in hydroelectricity consumption.

U.S. energy consumption of selected fuels

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review

Nuclear consumption in the United States increased less than 1% compared with 2017 levels but still set a record for electricity generation in 2018. The number of total operable nuclear generating units decreased to 98 in September 2018 when the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station in New Jersey was retired. Annual average nuclear capacity factors, which reflect the use of power plants, were slightly higher at 92.6% in 2018 compared with 92.2% in 2017.

More information about total energy consumption, production, trade, and emissions is available in EIA’s Monthly Energy Review.

April, 17 2019
Casing design course
Candidates :Drilling engineers/ drilling supervisors- Venue: Istanbul/Turkey- Duration: 5 days- For more information contact me at: Tel: +905364320900- [email protected] [email protected]
April, 17 2019
A New Frontier for LNG Pricing and Contracts

How’s this for a first? As the world’s demand for LNG continues to grow, the world’s largest LNG supplier (Shell) has inked an innovative new deal with one of the world’s largest LNG buyers (Tokyo Gas), including a coal pricing formula link for the first time in a large-scale LNG contract. It’s a notable change in an industry that has long depended on pricing gas off crude, but could this be a sign of new things to come?

Both parties have named the deal an ‘innovative solution’, with Tokyo Gas hailing it as a ‘further diversification of price indexation’ and Shell calling it a ‘tailored solutions including flexible contract terms under a variety of pricing indices.’ Beneath the rhetoric, the actual nuts and bolts is slightly more mundane. The pricing formula link to coal indexation will only be used for part of the supply, with the remainder priced off the conventional oil & gas-linked indexation ie. Brent and Henry Hub pricing. This makes sense, since Tokyo Gas will be sourcing LNG from Shell’s global portfolio – which includes upcoming projects in Canada and the US Gulf Coast. Neither party provided the split of volumes under each pricing method, meaning that the coal-linked portion could be small, acting as a hedge.

However, it is likely that the push for this came from Tokyo Gas. As one of the world’s largest LNG buyers, Tokyo Gas has been at the forefront of redefining the strict traditions of LNG contracts. Reading between the lines, this deal most likely does not include any destination restriction clauses, a change that Tokyo Gas has been particularly pushing for. With the trajectory for Brent crude prices uncertain – owing to a difficult-to-predict balance between OPEC+ and US shale – creating a third link in the pricing formula might be a good move. Particularly since in Japan, LNG faces off directly with coal in power generation. With the general retreat from nuclear power in the country, the coal-LNG battle will intensify.

What does this mean for the rest of the industry? Could coal-linked contracts become the norm? The industry has been discussing new innovations in LNG contracts at the recent LNG2019 conference in Shanghai, while the influx of new American LNG players hungry to seal deals has unleashed a new sense of flexibility. But will there be takers?

I am not a pricing expert but the answer is maybe. While Tokyo Gas predominantly uses natural gas as its power generation fuel (hence the name), it is competing with other players using cheaper coal-based generation. So in Japan, LNG and coal are direct competitors. This is also true in South Korea and much of Southeast Asia. In the two rising Asian LNG powerhouses, however, the situation is different. In China – on track to become the world’s largest LNG buyer in the next two decades – LNG is rarely used in power generation, consumed instead by residential heating. In India – where LNG imports are also rising sharply – LNG is primarily aimed at petrochemicals and fertiliser. LNG based power generation in China and India could see a surge, of course, but that will take plenty of infrastructure, and time, to build. It is far more likely that their contracts will be based off existing LNG or natural gas benchmarks, several of which are being developed in Asia alone.

If it takes off  the coal-link LNG formula is likely to remain a Asian-based development. But with the huge volumes demanded by countries in this region, that’s still a very big niche. Enough perhaps for the innovation to slowly gain traction elsewhere, next stop -  Europe?

The Shell-Tokyo Gas Deal:

Contract – April 2020-March 2030 (10 Years)

Volume – 500,000 metric tons per year

Source – Shell global portfolio

Pricing – Formula based on coal and oil & gas-linked indexes

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April, 15 2019