Hui Shan

Job Steward at NrgEdge. If you are an Energy Professional (Oil, Gas, Energy) contact me for opportunities
Last Updated: October 9, 2018
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Career Development
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The oil and gas industry offers lucrative career opportunities. Internet job boards have made the task easier for employers and job seekers. Companies today receive numerous applications that need screening to filter out substandard candidates. Telephonic interview is usually the first step in the recruitment process. It is used for both pre-screening and post-interview to acquire talented professionals. In cases where a candidate resides out-of-town, the complete job interview can be conducted over the telephone or via an audio-visual aid.

Job seekers usually get tensed about the telephonic interview because they feel they will not be able to express themselves better and might be less impressive. There is also a category of job seekers who take telephonic interviews casually. However, the importance of telephonic interviews cannot be ruled out and yes, we agree it is tricky to impress an interviewer over a call. But if you follow the tips below, you will certainly be successful in your attempt.

Purpose of the telephonic interview

Before you begin your preparation for the telephonic interview, it is important to analyze the purpose of the interview, which can be:

  • Examining your qualification, experience, and suitability for the job
  • Screening for the next round of personal interview
  • Technical interview to test your knowledge and experience
  • Full interview in case of an outstation candidate
  • Identifying the red flags (lack of communication skill, interpersonal skill, irrelevant work experience, poor academic background, unethical behavior) before you move to the next round.

Once you are aware of the purpose of the interview, you can plan and prepare better.

Schedule your call

Telephonic interviews are scheduled based on a mutually agreed date and time. So, make sure if the interviewer asks you for an available time slot, you provide a time where you will not be interrupted by background noises, family, friends or colleagues. However, if the interviewer shares his time slot and you are not comfortable with it, you should request for rescheduling to a later time or date. Even if you receive an unplanned call for an interview, you can politely request to reschedule.

Preparation for the call

Once you know the purpose and timings of the interview, you must start with the preparation for the interview. Here is what you can do:

  • Learn about the current company through their website and social media. Go over the employee review of the company and learn about the work culture, company performance and other initiatives by the company. It is advisable to take notes.
  • Check your resume and update it with any relevant information that you feel is missing. Try to highlight the skills and expertise that the current job role requires to increase your chances of selection. Prepare a cover letter, and specify your willingness to travel and relocate during your tenure as most oil and gas jobs require it.
  • Read the job requirement carefully because it will give you a clear hint of what they are expecting from you. Make sure during your interview, you emphasize your achievements that relate to company expectations. Prepare a list of skills that match the job requirement.

Cut out all distractions before the call

Make sure you are not distracted by your surroundings. So, switch off the TV and other audio/visual devices. Look for a quiet spot where you do not get disturbed. Create a comfortable setup and have your notes, resume and job description nearby for easy access. Remember, the interviewer can easily detect your distraction if you are delaying your responses or are not responding in an expected way. So, don’t ruin your chances by not focussing.

When making or answering a call

If you are expecting a call from the interviewer, be ready and wait for the call. Make sure you are seated comfortably at the position pre-decided by you and you have all the necessary documents along with a notepad. When you receive a call start the conversation by introducing yourself. However, if the interviewer expects you to call, make sure you call on time, introduce yourself and explain the reason for your call.

During the Interview Call

This is your time to shine. During your interview call, you’ll have to be well prepared with your answers. Here is how you can up your chances:

  • Rehearse your answers- There are common questions in the oil and gas industry which most employers ask in an interview, make sure you go over the FAQ and prepare the answers in advance. Additionally, go over the job requirements and prepare small notes on each section where the question can be asked. Back up all your answers with relevant work experience, project data, skill, and qualification. Rehearse your answers to appear confident.
  • Use voice tips to enhance your appeal- In face-to-face conversation, your body language plays a major role in your likeability factor. Similarly, there are body language tips that enhance the appeal of your voice. Refer below:
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  • Standing up allows you to breathe comfortably, speak clearly, staying alert and appear confident. Make sure you stand up while answering and pin the reference material at your eye level on the wall. Do not walk around too much to avoid breathlessness. 
  • When you smile, your tone of voice lifts and you appear more enthusiastic and positive. Even though the other person can’t see, the impact is conveyed.
  • Dressing up for a telephonic interview might sound silly but it does have an impact on your approach. If you are in shorts and a t-shirt you get too casual and laid back but when you are in formals, you automatically turn professional in approach. So, dress right to impress.
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  • Handle silence with patience- During the interview there will be silent moments where you will be tempted to talk unnecessarily just out of anxiety. But, know that the silence is natural it does not require a coverup. The interviewer needs time to write notes or read the next question or refer to your resume. So, stay calm and patient. Talk sensibly and only when required.
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  •  Be prepared to answer uncomfortable and tricky questionsMost of the times, the telephonic interview is designed to filter out substandard candidates. Therefore, any red flags that the recruiter encounters in your resume e.g. employment gaps, disciplinary actions, job hopping, getting fired, incomplete degree and so on will be critically questioned and reviewed. So be prepared with genuine answers to these questions. Be honest and provide your reasons. Also, suggest the way you have worked on or plan to overcome those issues.

Before you hang-up 

During an interview, it is always the interviewer who must signal that the call is over. Until you get the hint, do not rush. Once the interview is over, the interviewer will ask you for any final questions. This is your chance to clarify any doubts that you may have regarding the company, your position, job role and so on. Ask relevant questions. Try to avoid talking or negotiating your salary over the call. Meet in person to do the needful.

Follow up after the call

 As soon as you wind up the call, send a thank you note by email. If the interviewer has provided any dates for the results, consider following up. Even if you do not receive a call after a week, you may shoot a quick email enquiring about the process and update.

The success of your telephonic interview depends on your preparation and the above tips. If you have not qualified despite being good in the interview, then you might not be suitable for the job role. You must keep looking at relevant job openings at a dedicated site like Nrgedge for oil and gas related opportunities.

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Your Weekly Update: 15 -19 April 2019

Market Watch

Headline crude prices for the week beginning 15 April 2019 – Brent: US$71/b; WTI: US$63/b

  • Crude oil futures could be on the verge of snapping its longest weekly rally since 2016, as the market continues to balance managed crude supply from the OPEC+ nations with accelerating American output
  • Analysts are predicting that things could be coming to a head, which might see OPEC+ abandon its plans to stabilise supply and prices for an intense battle for market share with American shale producers instead
  • This seems to be echoed by comments from Saudi Arabia, hinting at a U-turn in OPEC+’s dedication to extending the current supply quota agreement
  • Russian Premier Vladimir Putin also chimed in, saying that he was ‘keeping his options open’ on the cuts and that he does not support an ‘uncontrollable’ increase in oil prices
  • Ongoing concerns in Libya, Venezuela and Iran are giving other OPEC nations some room to breathe in their supply deal, with the organisation reporting that its output plunged in March to 758,000 b/d below the expected Q2 average
  • After Japan reported it would hold back on resuming Iranian crude imports, India is now doing the same until clarification of American waivers on the sanctions is received
  • The International Energy Agency reports that it sees global oil markets tightening, warning that this could lower actual demand and forecasts
  • After a large 19 rig gain last week, the US reversed gear to lose 3 rigs, adding two oil sites while dropping five gas rigs, bringing the total active count to 1022
  • Rumbles of a shale slowdown in the US could keep crude prices on a gentle upward curve, with Brent likely to trade at US$71-72/b and WTI and US$63-64/b


Headlines of the week

Upstream

  • Shell has sold its 22.45% non-operating interest in the US Gulf of Mexico Caeser-Tonga asset to the Delek Group for some US$965 million in cash
  • US President Donald Trump is aiming to limit state powers over cross-border pipeline to promote projects stalled by state regulators over permit and environmental concerns through the issuance of Executive Orders
  • CNOOC has signed a new PSC with Smart Oil Investment for the Bohai 09/17 block in the shallow-water Qikou area of the Bohai Bay Basin in China
  • Also in the Bohai Bay, CNOOC and ConocoPhillips are planning to double production from the Penglai 19-3 field over the next few years
  • Shell has partnered with Sinopec in a maiden exploration of China’s shale oil potential, targeting the Dongying trough in Shengli in eastern China
  • Shell has also announced an ambitious drilling programme in Brazil, targeting the Argonauta pre-salt areas in the Santos Basin
  • Petrobras and the Brazilian government have settled a deepwater contract dispute for US$9.06 billion, paving the way for Petrobras and its partners to begin development of the crude deposits under the 2010 Transfer of Rights

Midstream & Downstream

  • Continuing on its diversification strategy, Saudi Aramco is now looking to double its global refining network to some 10 mmb/d by 2030 as a means of locking in buyers for its crude amidst intense competition, which would see Aramco to continue investing in key global refining centres
  • Shell is aiming to complete the overhaul of its RCCU at the 218 kb/d Norco refinery in Louisiana by May, ahead the US summer driving gasoline demand
  • Sinopec reports that its Jinling refinery in Jiangsu has sold its first 4,200-ton cargo of low-sulfur marine fuel ahdad of the new IMO standards kicking in
  • Saudi Aramco has signed an agreement with Poland’s PKN Orlen to trade Arabian-grade crude to the refiner in exchanges for high-sulfur fuel oil

Natural Gas/LNG

  • Total has been awarded an exploration licence for Block 12 in Oman, with the onshore 10,000 sq.km asset near the gas-rich Greater Barik area that is expected to hold ‘significant prospective gas resources’
  • Saudi Aramco is planning to move into LNG for first time ever, offering to supply Pakistan with cargos on a spot or short-term basis, even though it does not produce LNG and has only just begun developing an LNG trading desk
  • First feed gas has begun to flow at Sempra Energy’s Cameron LNG Train 1 in Louisiana, the final commissioning phase for the project
  • Keppel Gas in Singapore has imported its first 160,000 cbm cargo of US LNG under the country’s Spot Import Policy, its first from outside Southeast Asia and the first trickle in an exported flood of American LNG into the region

Corporate

  • Saudi Aramco has issued its first global bond, raising US$100 billion from the sale, above and beyond the initial expectations of US$10-15 billion
  • Abu Dhabi’s Mubadala Investment Company has sold a ‘significant minority interest’ of 30-40% in Spanish energy firm Cepsa to investment group The Carlyle Group, but will retain majority shareholder
  • Canadian player Africa Oil has acquired 18.8% of fellow Canadian upstream firm Eco (Atlantic) Oil and Gas, but stressed that the acquisition was for investment purposes with no intention of exercising control
April, 23 2019
In 2018, the United States consumed more energy than ever before

U.S. total energy consumption

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review

Primary energy consumption in the United States reached a record high of 101.3 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2018, up 4% from 2017 and 0.3% above the previous record set in 2007. The increase in 2018 was the largest increase in energy consumption, in both absolute and percentage terms, since 2010.

Consumption of fossil fuels—petroleum, natural gas, and coal—grew by 4% in 2018 and accounted for 80% of U.S. total energy consumption. Natural gas consumption reached a record high, rising by 10% from 2017. This increase in natural gas, along with relatively smaller increases in the consumption of petroleum fuels, renewable energy, and nuclear electric power, more than offset a 4% decline in coal consumption.

U.S. total energy consumption

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review

Petroleum consumption in the United States increased to 20.5 million barrels per day (b/d), or 37 quadrillion Btu in 2018, up nearly 500,000 b/d from 2017 and the highest level since 2007. Growth was driven primarily by increased use in the industrial sector, which grew by about 200,000 b/d in 2018. The transportation sector grew by about 140,000 b/d in 2018 as a result of increased demand for fuels such as petroleum diesel and jet fuel.

Natural gas consumption in the United States reached a record high 83.1 billion cubic feet/day (Bcf/d), the equivalent of 31 quadrillion Btu, in 2018. Natural gas use rose across all sectors in 2018, primarily driven by weather-related factors that increased demand for space heating during the winter and for air conditioning during the summer. As more natural gas-fired power plants came online and existing natural gas-fired power plants were used more often, natural gas consumption in the electric power sector increased 15% from 2017 levels to 29.1 Bcf/d. Natural gas consumption also grew in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors in 2018, increasing 13%, 10%, and 4% compared with 2017 levels, respectively.

Coal consumption in the United States fell to 688 million short tons (13 quadrillion Btu) in 2018, the fifth consecutive year of decline. Almost all of the reduction came from the electric power sector, which fell 4% from 2017 levels. Coal-fired power plants continued to be displaced by newer, more efficient natural gas and renewable power generation sources. In 2018, 12.9 gigawatts (GW) of coal-fired capacity were retired, while 14.6 GW of net natural gas-fired capacity were added.

U.S. fossil fuel energy consumption by sector

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review

Renewable energy consumption in the United States reached a record high 11.5 quadrillion Btu in 2018, rising 3% from 2017, largely driven by the addition of new wind and solar power plants. Wind electricity consumption increased by 8% while solar consumption rose 22%. Biomass consumption, primarily in the form of transportation fuels such as fuel ethanol and biodiesel, accounted for 45% of all renewable consumption in 2018, up 1% from 2017 levels. Increases in wind, solar, and biomass consumption were partially offset by a 3% decrease in hydroelectricity consumption.

U.S. energy consumption of selected fuels

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Monthly Energy Review

Nuclear consumption in the United States increased less than 1% compared with 2017 levels but still set a record for electricity generation in 2018. The number of total operable nuclear generating units decreased to 98 in September 2018 when the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station in New Jersey was retired. Annual average nuclear capacity factors, which reflect the use of power plants, were slightly higher at 92.6% in 2018 compared with 92.2% in 2017.

More information about total energy consumption, production, trade, and emissions is available in EIA’s Monthly Energy Review.

April, 17 2019
Casing design course
Candidates :Drilling engineers/ drilling supervisors- Venue: Istanbul/Turkey- Duration: 5 days- For more information contact me at: Tel: +905364320900- [email protected] [email protected]
April, 17 2019